Tag Archives: antanaclasis

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

I can’t stomach your stomach any more! When we first met you were slim and trim–you looked like a Greek God. Now, you look like a bloated Greek gyro.

For some reason you seem to be proud of your protrusion. Well, it does not make me feel proud to be with you out in public.

I hope you’re willing to do something about your overeating so we can cruise into the future together–I just don’t want to worry about having to give you CPR at some point, call 911, or listen to your so-called “friends” call you fatty names behind your back.

I’m not tired of loving you, but I do actually get tired defending you, worrying about you, and worrying about us.

For our relationship’s sake, please do something about your weight.

If you bring your dimensions back to where they were when we first met, there will be positive dimensions added back to our relationship that will benefit us both!

Just let me know how I can help. Together, we can do it!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploceantanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (polyptoton). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Syrian “child brides” are no longer allowed into the Netherlands accompanying their refugee husbands. “Child brides” seems like an oxymoron, like the famous “jumbo shrimp” or “military intelligence.” Unfortunately, “child bride” is not a figure of speech. Take for example the pregnant 14-year-old who went missing from her 40-year-old husband at one of the Netherlands’ refugees camps. Definitely a child. Definitely a bride  Definitely soon to be a mother.

Upon arrival in the Netherlands, adult husbands and their underage wives (aka child brides) should be divorced and the husbands required to pay alimony and child support for the rest of their lives.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

Let’s ship it by ship!

What, are you kidding? If you’re shipping mail by ship you might as well be shipping chain mail! How utterly Medieval!

If you want the package to arrive before the end of Twenty-Fifteen, send it out via Fedex before 20:15! It will get there by tomorrow & it will only cost you $20.15!

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Antistasis

Antistasis (an-ti’-sta-sis): The repetition of a word in a contrary sense. Often, simply synonymous with antanaclasis.

I am sorry you are such a sorry example of a human being! You are a laugh, but not the kind of laugh that makes me laugh! You’re the kind laugh that makes me want to vomit.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Antistasis

Antistasis (an-ti’-sta-sis): The repetition of a word in a contrary sense. Often, simply synonymous with antanaclasis.

If you believe you’re covered by the cope of heavan, you will cope more readily with everything under the sun.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Being free is to be human, and being human is to be free. You may think that wild animals or pets off their leashes run free, but running free is not being free. Rather, it is being loose. Just because a living body can move, it does not mean that it is free. To be free is to choose, and choice is induced by persuasion, and persuasion is engendered by symbols, and symbols  are endowed with meanings by humans being free!

Again, bodily movement does not signify freedom. Being free is symbolically constituted in your humane human head as it searches for, or listens for a good reason to to do something and a plan for taking action to make it be or not be.

That’s the Burkean way!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Hope for rain and hope will reign even if it doesn’t rain!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

Let’s meet at the meet after you’ve run the run.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

The government certainly has the right to tax us, but let’s make sure the taxes are right.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

When your yacht  leaked, you bailed it out. When your business failed, you bailed out.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

A day without at least one mistake is a day that is a mistake.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antistasis

Antistasis (an-ti’-sta-sis): The repetition of a word in a contrary sense. Often, simply synonymous with antanaclasis.

It’s better to order your finances than to order more stuff on the Internet!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

There isn’t much room, but at least I finally have my own room!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)