Category Archives: periphrasis

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)


Here comes God. Just because he won $5000 on Take Five’s evening draw, he thinks he has divine powers. He has easily spent $5,000 over the years on losing tickets. Where were his divine powers all these years as he racked up loss after loss? Also, he won the $5,000 on a quick pick without even choosing the numbers.

It’s amazing the links we forge in chains of causation. We posit ‘reasons’ as effects hijack or influence our lives—we seek motives behind luck and chance: God Loves me, I didn’t eat my vegetables, I am bad/good. The motive elevates the effect giving it moral import, when in fact, luck is luck and chance is chance.

As I turned to grab my beer, my mood candle toppled to the floor, falling from the mantle and soaking the carpet with hot wax. The irony didn’t escape me as I wrote it off to bad luck, and stopped there to see if I could resist my desire to ascertain what motivated the candle’s fall. Was it my fault? Then, unwillingly I started thinking of all the reasons I was to blame—from buying the candle at the Farmers’ Market, to lighting it and setting it on the mantle. In a remote sense, these things contributed to the candle’s fall and the spilling of wax on the carpet: having the candle, putting it on the mantle, lighting it.

Although I ended up attributing the candle’s fall to bad luck, if only I hadn’t bought the candle in the first place none of this would’ve happened and I wouldn’t be out $600 for the carpet’s cleaning. Then I remembered, the guy who sold me the candle told me he had a dry cleaning business and made candles as a hobby. He gave me his business card and, without thinking, I called him to clean my carpet. Damn! Why hadn’t I made this connection before: he sells ‘falling’ candles, gives you his card when you buy one, and then when you call him, charges $600 to clean up the mess. I called the police and they laughed at me: “Mr. Crayola is a regular George Washington. Your candle-thing is psycho.” I hung up, very angry. Then there was a knock on my door. I opened it slowly. It was Mr. Crayola holding a lit candle. “No police! You persist, my son will stick the burning candle down your throat!” Mr. Crayola yelled. His son was gigantic. I knew if I didn’t capitulate, I would die by candle-cide.

So, that was it. I went back to my life, but not until I had burned down Mr. Crayola’s dry cleaning establishment (with his son tied up in the back room). I fled to Costa Rica where there’s no extradition and opened a hobby shop.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. Also available in a Kindle edition for $5.99.

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)


Hey look, it’s The Liar—fooling all of his followers all of the time. His technique is to appear to believe himself, himself. He affects righteous indignation all day every day, floating his lies on it with a raised voice, rolling eyes and wild gestures. The only time he slows down is to compliment Newsmax, because they compliment him and repeat his lies.

Lincoln was the Great Emancipator. Trump is the Great Prevaricator. Both Republicans. Two different trajectories. One directed us to affect charity toward the defeated after a war, the other, directs us to affect malice toward the winners after an election. Trump’s rebuke is a raw display of his sense of entitlement’s delusional inability to deal with democracy—to accept the majority’s voice as a guarantor of the Republic’s future. Prince Donald sees it differently. He believes he has a right (maybe divine) to be President and that that right has been usurped by a “stolen” election. Yes, “stolen” from him by the will of the people.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. Also available in a Kindle edition for $5.99.

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

There goes the orange two-legged Fat Glob followed by his pet Cheese of Kiss Ass trying to hump Fat Glob’s calf while he’s on the move–headed briskly to the Chief Executive Trough. Today they’re serving fermented pig slop seasoned with dandruff and a sprinkling of nasal hair. The chef is tense because he’s never made anything quite this disgusting before. However, Kiss Ass has assured him that Fat Glob will love it. He is somewhat relieved, but still a little worried. He guesses he’ll just have to lie about where the nasal hairs came from.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. Also available in a Kindle edition for $5.99.

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

Here comes Big Mac doing the Big Trump walk and talking incoherent talk–very cheesy.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

She’s pulling another Hillary!

Pre-Democratic Primary Election, she keeps talking about New York as if she’s been here since the 17th century! The “as if” factor is wearing thin.  I, for one am tired of listening through the vague repetitive references to aspects of Hillary that I, as a New Yorker am supposed to identify with.

The “Hillary” she’s pulling regarding New York is the “I was your Senator . . .” move. Yes, it’s a fact. She was my Senator, but without being reminded, I don’t remember anything that happened on her watch aside from the fact that everybody knew she was using her elected office as a stepping stone to bigger and better things. For all the time it’s taken her to step off the New York Senator stone, she might as well have made New York a hiking trail to the moon. But really, what the heck did she do for me when she was senator?

Oh–thank you Google!

Hillary sponsored 363 bills! Three became law. Perhaps the least memorable bill to become law was “A bill to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2951 New York Highway 43 in Averill Park, New York, as the ‘Major George Quamo Post Office Building’.” Just in case you’re wondering what the other two are:

Kate Mullany National Historic Site Act

A bill to designate a portion of United States Route 20A, located in Orchard Park, New York, as the “Timothy J. Russert Highway”

3 for 363! I think I may just have Bernied Hillary (look up all the stats)! I must admit though, I do like the Tim Russert Highway! Too bad Bernie.

Oh–I just thought of another piece of pre-primary Hillarying: Hillary’s trying to Hillary New York with her NY residency thing!

We’ve all heard the cliche “A house is not a home.” Even though it’s a mansion in Hillary’s case, I would like to know how many days per year she spends there chilling with The Billster. I know it can’t be less than zero, but I don’t whether it’s more than that.

Hillary: Is your “residence” in New York a house or a home? That is, shouldn’t  you call New York your House State rather than your Home State?

Hillary. Hillary. Hillary. It’s an innuendo crescendo! An allusion collusion! A salami tsunami! (I can’t think of a word that rhymes with “baloney”)

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

I wish Put-in would Pull-out before things get out of hand in Crimea! If there was a clearly focused Camer-on, there would probably be better news from Ukraine.

  • Post your own periphrasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

Mother Romney is no Mother Theresa.  She’s no mother Hubbard either. NEVER a Ma Kettle! No my friends, if she’s anybody, she’s  a regular Olivia Walton. The only difference is that Ann has two Cadillacs & Olivia had no Cadillacs.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

Let’s go to death on a bun for lunch.

Those shoes are so Hollywood.

  • Post your own periphrasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Periphrasis

Periphrasis (per-if’-ra-sis): The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a species of circumlocution); or, conversely, the use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it. (Circumlocutions are rhetorically useful as euphemisms, as a method of amplification, or to hint at something without stating it.)

1. Wide Stance was back in the news again last week!

2. When it comes to national health care policies, that candidate’s not exactly a Hillary.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).