Aganactesis

Aganactesis (ag’-an-ak-tee’-sis): An exclamation proceeding from deep indignation.

You ate my yogurt again.

What gives you the right to eat somebody else’s food?

What are you, some kind of hunter-gatherer? This is a house, not the woods. If you want to hunt and gather, go outside.

Whatever you do: Do not touch my yogurt ever again. Stop being so inconsiderate! Buy your own damn yogurt!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Allegory

Allegory (al’-le-go-ry): A sustained metaphor continued through whole sentences or even through a whole discourse.

The Most Important Man in the World

There was an elderly Emperor who lived in a big white house in the capital of the States United of America! He was the Most Important Man in the World (M.I.M.I.T.W). He was in charge of everything in the world (at least he thought he was). All he needed to do was sit at his desk in the big white house and sign orders abolishing everything the former tenant had decreed–from environmental policies to foreign policies.

M.I.M.I.T.W’s signature constituted God-like mandates: commandments from on high. Many of them began with the sacred words “Thou shalt not . . .” For example, “Thou shalt not spend tax dollars on climate change research . . .”

That’s power!

On the weekends M.I.M.I.T.W would put down his pen, get out of his chair, and fly to his beach chateau Margo del Beacho. Most recently,  when he was there, he ate a “beautiful” chocolate cake and told the Navy to fire missiles and the Air Force to drop HUGE bombs. He loved eating “beautiful” chocolate cake, dining with other big shots, and blowing things up! He said it kept him young.

M.I.M.I.T.W also loved to threaten entire countries, if they seemed to be misbehaving. In addition, he was also quite happy that each weekend trip to his beach chateau only cost $3,000,000.  In his view, that was a small price to pay to eat “beautiful” chocolate cake, play golf, hang out with other big shots, and blow stuff up via phone calls.

Most important though, he loved to go tweet-tweet late at night–making brief birdie songs on the Internet with crazy lyrics! The craziest one I heard was “I was wire tapped.” It had a sort of blues kick to it that was more than it deserved.

Sadly, it all came to an end when M.I.M.I.T.W choked on a piece of “beautiful” chocolate cake during a weekend visit to Margo del Beacho.  Mr. Heimlich was off for the weekend and couldn’t help out.

We are so sorry.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Alleotheta

Alleotheta (al-le-o-the’-ta): Substitution of one case, gender, mood, number, tense, or person for another. Synonymous with enallage. [Some rhetoricians claim that alleotheta is a] general category that includes antiptosis [(a type of enallage in which one grammatical case is substituted for another)] and all forms of enallage [(the substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions)].

We was looking for the dead end at the end of the dead end street–the street marked with a yellow diamond-shape sign that said “Dead End.”

Why?

We had some loot we need to hide & figure that the end of a dead end street would be a good place. Vacant with lots of bushes!

Unfortunately, we drive to the end of the dead end & it isn’t dead! It’s a cul-de-sac with a few houses with porch lights on.

No good for loot-hiding–but we see one house with no lights on. Hmmm–should we ‘visit’ it? We decide ‘no’ and drive away.

After some conversation, we decide to hide the loot in my garage underneath my ride mower. Lawn mowing season is still 2 months away: the stuff will be safe & I’ll check it every once-in-a-while.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Alliteration

Alliteration (al-lit’-er-a’-tion): Repetition of the same letter or sound within nearby words. Most often, repeated initial consonants. Taken to an extreme alliteration becomes the stylistic vice of paroemion where nearly every word in a sentence begins with the same consonant.

I’ve got to tell you: Stop using the credit card! You are running up big bills that we are barely able to pay. Besides, you are buying whacky stuff. Like, we don’t need an electric egg beater that checks your blood pressure while you’re making a soufflé. We don’t even eat soufflés, let alone make them. Check your blood pressure? God, you are in perfect shape!

Oh–also–the ‘Cat Collection’ of cat suits and cat hats. We don’t even have a cat– so we don’t need a kitty cop suit–even if we had a cat we wouldn’t need a kitty cop suit!

The list is long of stupid stuff you have purchased: PLEASE stop using the credit card, or I’m going cut it up.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Allusion

Allusion (ə-ˈlü-zhən):[1] A reference/representation of/to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art . . . “a brief reference, explicit or indirect, to a person, place or event, or to another literary work or passage”. It is left to the reader or hearer to make the connection . . . ; an overt allusion is a misnomer for what is simply a reference.[2]

It was one of the worst storms we ever had, and the wind certainly did not cry Mary as Jimi would have it. Rather, it howled like a hungry wolf at my door, felled 100-year old trees, cut off everybody’s electricity, and blew my lawn chairs away (I have no idea where they are).

I don’t know where to start my search for my lawn chairs–I wouldn’t be surprised if they are decorating a tree somewhere nearby.

1. Phonetic transcription courtesy of Miriam-Webster’s On-Line Dictionaryhttp://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allusion <3/6/08>.

2. Definition courtesy of Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allusion <3/6/08>.

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Amphibologia

Amphibologia (am’-fi-bo-lo’-gi-a): Ambiguity of grammatical structure, often occasioned by mispunctuation. [A vice of ambiguity.]

I surprised my wife in my new underpants. She was watching TV and I paraded in–the underpants had just arrived from Duluth Trading Post via FEDEX and I wanted to show them off! I couldn’t wait.

Like I said, she was surprised!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Ampliatio

Ampliatio (am’-pli-a’-ti-o): Using the name of something or someone before it has obtained that name or after the reason for that name has ceased. A form of epitheton.

(1) Hello Doctor!

Six more months and you’ll be official! Wishing you luck with the remainder of your studies! As your father, I want to be your first official patient! Nothing serious–just a physical examination!

(2) Hey Speedy!

I think it’s a great idea that you’ve decided to start an aggressive diet and exercise program! Lose 100 pounds and you’ll be back at the head of the pack–like you were in high school. The way you ran the 50-yard dash–wow! You certainly earned your nickname back in the day!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

How far should we go as we condemn our enemies? Should we threaten to kill them? Should we see justice done?

We all agree that our enemies are dangerous and pose a threat to our way of life, and the lives of many innocent victims: men and women who just want to live their lives in peace.

Time is of the essence. We should make our choice before it is too late.

We must bomb them in their strongholds–especially in the rugged hills where they gather in caves and tunnels and plan their next attack or construct their IEDs.

Who would object? None of us would object. The die is cast. We will bomb their strongholds tomorrow at 04.00. We will eliminate the threat they pose. We will help our allies live better lives.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed test added by Gorgias.

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Anacoloutha

Anacoloutha (an-a-co’-lu-tha): Substituting one word with another whose meaning is very close to the original, but in a non-reciprocal fashion; that is, one could not use the first, original word as a substitute for the second. This is the opposite of acoloutha.

The night sky was lit with a multitude of shining stars. The glimmering points made a tapestry of the dark clear heavens and sent an irresistible invitation to look up and be awed.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anacoluthon

Anacoluthon (an-a-co-lu’-thon): A grammatical interruption or lack of implied sequence within a sentence. That is, beginning a sentence in a way that implies a certain logical resolution, but concluding it differently than the grammar leads one to expect. Anacoluthon can be either a grammatical fault or a stylistic virtue, depending on its use. In either case, it is an interruption or a verbal lack of symmetry. Anacoluthon is characteristic of spoken language or interior thought, and thus suggests those domains when it occurs in writing.

That bomb was huge–bigger than huge: gargantuan and don’t get a stiff neck looking at your iPhone!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

Spring is starting here. Here, the grass is turning green once more. Once more, the little flowers are blooming. Blooming wild purple violets, white snowdrops, pink trillium, green and purple Jack-in-the-Pulpit,  and more: More than we can imagine as we say goodbye to another cruel, yet beautiful, winter.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Anamnesis

Anamnesis (an’-am-nee’-sis): Calling to memory past matters. More specifically, citing a past author [apparently] from memory.  Anamnesis helps to establish ethos [credibility], since it conveys the idea that the speaker is knowledgeable of the received wisdom from the past.

Maya Angelou tells us: “If we lose love and self respect for each other, this is how we finally die.”

Sadly, this quotation brings to mind what we’re struggling with about the Republican stance on healthcare.

It seems all too obvious that their healthcare plan is driven by a spirit of indifference, if not outright animosity, toward the people it is supposed to serve. “Love and self respect for each other” are absent.

That is, their healthcare proposals do not seem to be driven by a spirit of compassionate regard toward the sick, the financially strapped, and the elderly. Their rationale seems to be driven by a desire to propose and implement a plan that does more to increase, rather than decrease, human suffering–and “this is how [they] finally die.”

Let’s put “love and self respect for each other” back in play and come up with a plan that says “Compassion.”

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Gorgias has inserted the bracketed words [apparently] and [credibility].

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Quotation from Maya Angelou: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/mayaangelo131752.html?src=t_respect

 

Anaphora

Anaphora (an-aph’-o-ra): Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines.

Another day:  Impulsive Tweets at 6.00 am

Another day: No plans. No promises. No clues–just hints and veiled threats addressed to Syria, Russia, China, North Korea,  and Sesame Street.

Another day: another nightmare.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Anapodoton

Anapodoton (an’-a-po’-do-ton): A figure in which a main clause is suggested by the introduction of a subordinate clause, but that main clause never occurs.

Anapodoton is a kind of anacoluthon, since grammatical expectations are interrupted. If the expression trails off, leaving the subordinate clause incomplete, this is sometimes more specifically called anantapodotonAnapodoton has also named what occurs when a main clause is omitted because the speaker interrupts himself/herself to revise the thought, leaving the initial clause grammatically unresolved but making use of it nonetheless by recasting its content into a new, grammatically complete sentence.

When I made my 90,000 . . . Money makes the world go around, sometimes fast, sometimes slow, but always working away in the background and the foreground generating profits, losses, and break-even results.

If you can’t find a job . . . I couldn’t find a job so I started my own business. I’ve been selling lab equipment to “entrepreneurs” who live in mobile homes on the outskirts of towns across the Southern regions of the USA.

It’s kind of funny, but they all have in common that they pay cash and have skinny bodies and bad teeth. I often wonder what they use the lab equipment for, but I don’t want to know–ever! I just assume they are some kind of scientists. Maybe they all have Federal grants to find a cure for cancer or or save the coral reefs.

But, like I said: It’s non of my business!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anastrophe

Anastrophe (an-as’-tro-phee): Departure from normal word order for the sake of emphasis. Anastrophe is most often a synonym for hyperbaton, but is occasionally referred to as a more specific instance of hyperbaton: the changing of the position of only a single word.

I am looking for my mind of peace. Things are so hectic since we opened it seems like my brain is being beaten by an egg beater, and I get hardly any sleep.

Whose idea was it to stay open 24-7? Probably mine out of a lack of experience and a strong dose of greed–it’s in my DNA. Damn

Let’s go back to the drawing board and try to figure out a reasonable business model–one that won’t wear us away before we’ve even had time to get a sense of whether we’ve got a winner here.

Let’s meet in the back room tonight.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

You have an amazing collection of handbags. Nearly every brand–none of them hardly used at all. So many colors, textures and materials–from formal to informal and everything in between! It must’ve taken you a decade to pull it together.

But

It’s a shame that you don’t have anything made in USA. I don’t care what the rationale may be: it’s a huge gap that diminishes the value of your entire collection.

You better get out there and find some representative handbags that are made in the USA. It shouldn’t be much of a challenge–that’s part of the reason why their absence yells “incomplete collection.”

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

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Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

I can’t stomach your stomach any more! When we first met you were slim and trim–you looked like a Greek God. Now, you look like a bloated Greek gyro.

For some reason you seem to be proud of your protrusion. Well, it does not make me feel proud to be with you out in public.

I hope you’re willing to do something about your overeating so we can cruise into the future together–I just don’t want to worry about having to give you CPR at some point, call 911, or listen to your so-called “friends” call you fatty names behind your back.

I’m not tired of loving you, but I do actually get tired defending you, worrying about you, and worrying about us.

For our relationship’s sake, please do something about your weight.

If you bring your dimensions back to where they were when we first met, there will be positive dimensions added back to our relationship that will benefit us both!

Just let me know how I can help. Together, we can do it!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Antanagoge

Antanagoge (an’-ta-na’-go-gee): Putting a positive spin on something that is nevertheless acknowledged to be negative or difficult.

Well, here we are by the side of the road with a flat tire. AAA says they’ll be here in about 45 minutes.

I know we’re stuck! But we’re stuck together–all of us in the same place at once. Let’s use this together time to talk about Josie’s upcoming wedding. It’s a great time to at least start our conversation.

Again, let’s use this time to do something worthwhile–it’s something we’ve been putting off ever since they announced to us that their marriage is looming on the horizon. Betty, what do you think?

How can we undermine Josie’s plans to marry that idiot?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Antenantiosis

Antenantiosis  (an’-ten-an’-ti-os’-is): See litotes. (Deliberate understatement, especially when expressing a thought by denying its opposite. The Ad Herennium author suggests litotes as a means of expressing modesty [downplaying one’s accomplishments] in order to gain the audience’s favor [establishing ethos]).

I’m not worthy! There is no way I deserve an award for my acting in that movie.

This is a total shock!

BUT

I accept your award with humble gratitude and deep regard for your choice. I respect your judgment, and even though I don’t think I deserve it, I will cherish this award for the rest of my life. It means a lot to me–more than you’ll ever know.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anthimeria

Anthimeria (an-thi-mer’-i-a): Substitution of one part of speech for another (such as a noun used as a verb).

Let’s truck those apples to market before they start turning brown!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anthypophora

Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

We need a new President! Democrat? Libertarian? Green Party?

I didn’t include Republican. Why? I know where that would take us. Don’t you know where we’ve been so far? On a hell ride from outer space.

Trump’s Executive Orders are like a string of nightmares scaring America. But, it’s not just about Trump, it’s about the entire Republican party. For example, their health care bill is like something planned to cull the weak and sick from America’s citizenry. What is it worth? Nothing but pointed criticism.

I am anxiously awaiting the visit of China’s President. Let’s hope some tangible good comes of it.

I’m not optimistic.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Antimetabole

Antimetabole (an’-ti-me-ta’-bo-lee): Repetition of words, in successive clauses, in reverse grammatical order.

Troubles are problems! Problems are troubles! No problems, no troubles. No troubles, no problems.

But so much of contemporary life in the USA is just one big troubling problem, especially with current Presidential politics.

What seems like every day, there is at least one Executive Order signed by President Trump that dismantles common sense and undermines compassion and is solely premised on the power of the Presidential pen: the power to erase each and every vestige of the policies enacted by Obama during his Presidency.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Antimetathesis

Antimetathesis (an-ti-me-ta’-the-sis): Inversion of the members of an antithesis.

You are big.

You are small.

Big and small. Small and big.

Your belly hangs over your pants–so big!

Your conscience can dance on the head of pin–so small.

Big body. Tiny soul.

You need help. A good diet and exercise program will help your body. Maybe psychological counseling will help your soul.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antiprosopopoeia

Antiprosopopoeia (an-ti-pro-so-po-pe’-i-a): The representation of persons [or other animate beings] as inanimate objects. This inversion of prosopopoeia or personification can simply be the use of a metaphor to depict or describe a person [or other animate being].

A: Hey Weedwhacker!  How’s the landscaping business going?

B: Come on, my name is Edward–I’m not a piece of lawn maintenance equipment!

A:  Ha! Ha! Weedwhacker has a first name! Hey Edward Weedwhacker, how’s the landscaping business going?

B: I got your weedwhacker–and you’re a big fat weed. Get over there against the fence! Right now! Pull up your pants legs or I’ll shove this weedwhacker into your face.

A: Ok. Ok.

Ow! Ow! Hell! What’re you doing? Ow! No! No! My ankles are bleeding! Stop it! Pleeeeease!

B: What’s my name?

A: Edward. Edward. Edward. Your name is Edward. Edward!

B: Very good Weeny Weed-head. I’ve got to get back to work now. Please don’t ever bother me again when I’m on the job. You’re lucky I didn’t mow you.

A: OK Edward, I get the message, but I’m going to have you arrested.

What’s that?

B: Hedge clippers. But, in your case, we’ll call them head clippers.

A: I promise, I won’t have you arrested! I swear. Get away from me!

No . . . !

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

 

Antirrhesis

Antirrhesis (an-tir-rhee’-sis): Rejecting reprehensively the opinion or authority of someone.

Why do I hear “quack, quack, quack” when you start talking about climate change? Do you really think the white lab coat you’re wearing gives you any credibility? Maybe, if you’re playing Ken & Barbie and you’re modeling Ken’s Halloween costume, it would work to afford you some credibility, but only as Dr. Barbie’s bumbling sidekick Prof. Hoax.

As far as being a ‘real’ scientist goes, the white coat’s not enough–especially when you start talking about so-called “natural” forces as the cause of climate change, rather than human agency.  The ‘natural forces’ you cite are humanly induced effects first, and secondarily, causes of bad things: like melting polar icecaps, flooding Pacific islands, destruction of coral reefs, wildfires, etc.

The only positive thought I have whenever I hear you speak is that it is your Constitutional right to do so. That’s after I yell “boo!” at you and wonder once again, who the hell is paying you to fill peoples’ heads with lies and nonsense. In short, who’s the evil rich person buying the bullshit you’re selling? Who?

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Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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