Diazeugma

Diazeugma (di-a-zoog’-ma): The figure by which a single subject governs several verbs or verbal constructions (usually arranged in parallel fashion and expressing a similar idea); the opposite of zeugma.

I couldn’t make it to lunch today because I forgot about the luncheon, wasn’t hungry enough to eat lunch, and wasn’t ready to meet.

Let’s reschedule for next week. I promise I’ll make it!

  • Post your own diazeugma on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu)

A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 200 schemes and tropes with their definitions and examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for. Not only that, the examples of schemes and tropes may prompt you to try to create your own examples and use them as a writing exercise and as springboards for creating longer narratives.

Dicaeologia

Dicaeologia (di-kay-o-lo’-gi-a): Admitting what’s charged against one, but excusing it by necessity.

A: Did you pee on the bed?

B: Yes, but I didn’t really want to do it. The cadre of ‘property developers’ told me it was a “top secret” fundraising event. Put that way, I couldn’t say no.

And I say, ok, why not? It’s just a bed in a hotel room. My experience as a real estate investor is all I need to make the best choices about things like this: I say no harm no foul: NEWS MEDIA get off my back!

  • Post your own dicaeologia on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 200 schemes and tropes with their definitions and examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for. Not only that, the examples of schemes and tropes may prompt you to try to create your own examples as a writing/speaking exercise, and use them as springboards for creating longer narratives.

Dilemma

Dilemma (di-lem’-ma): Offering to an opponent a choice between two (equally unfavorable) alternatives.

Let’s see–you spent all the money that you borrowed from me, and now it’s time to pay me back.  You knew ‘paying back’ was part of the deal and you have not shown any interest in paying me back.

So,  which are you going to do: work off what you borrowed by working around the house and yard, or taking out a loan from a real bank and paying me back.

What’s it going to be: work it off, or take out another loan?

Post your own dilemma on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 200 schemes and tropes with their definitions and examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for. Not only that, the examples of schemes and tropes may prompt you to try to create your own examples and use them as springboards for creating longer narratives.

Dirimens Copulatio

Dirimens Copulatio (di’-ri-mens ko-pu-la’-ti-o): A figure by which one balances one statement with a contrary, qualifying statement (sometimes conveyed by “not only … but also” clauses). A sort of arguing both sides of an issue.

Protagoras (c. 485-410 BC) asserted that “to every logos (speech or argument) another logos is opposed,” a theme continued in the Dissoi Logoi of his time, later codified as the notion of arguments in utrumque partes (on both sides). Aristotle asserted that thinking in opposites is necessary both to arrive at the true state of a matter (opposition as an epistemological heuristic) and to anticipate counterarguments. This latter, practical purpose for investigating opposing arguments has been central to rhetoric ever since sophists like Antiphon (c. 480-410 BC) provided model speeches (his Tetralogies) showing how one might argue for either the prosecution or for the defense on any given issue. As such, [this] names not so much a figure of speech as a general approach to rhetoric, or an overall argumentative strategy. However, it could be manifest within a speech on a local level as well, especially for the purposes of exhibiting fairness (establishing ethos [audience perception of speaker credibility]).

This pragmatic embrace of opposing arguments permeates rhetorical invention, arrangement, and rhetorical pedagogy

I want a muffin for breakfast. Not only that, I want it toasted in the toaster-oven and buttered to perfection. Not only is it your turn to cook this week, but it is time for us to figure out how to make muffins. But you disagree? Come on, no time for that: get out the flour, the cranberries, the butter, the mixing bowl, the sugar, and most important, a spatula.

  • Post your own dirimens copulatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition and commentary courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 200 schemes and tropes with their definitions and examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for. Not only that, the examples of schemes and tropes may prompt you to try to create your own examples and use them as springboards for creating longer narratives.

Distinctio

Distinctio (dis-tinc’-ti-o): Eliminating ambiguity surrounding a word by explicitly specifying each of its distinct meanings.

Love: A desire for the ‘other.’

Love’s desire ranges from carnal to Platonic. Accordingly, one may claim to love another person on the basis of a carnal desire for the other person. I know it’s stupid, but it’s what we do.

But carnal desire and its fulfillment set a shaky foundation for love: Why shaky? Because it demands love making: a bodily experience whose gratification is short-lived. Its repetition in a given relationship gives it a slight echo of love’s eternity, but its ‘carnal truth’ is short lived & we all know it.

Platonic love is set on a more enduring, stable and appropriate foundation and best deserves the name of Love–it is closer to a spiritual experience. As it has been handed down, Platonic Love requires a relationship grounded in edifying communication. It fosters learning the IDEA of love, and it’s love’s Idea rightly learned that prompts and aims one’s particular ‘loves’ to be taken up with a MUTUAL focus on the IDEA of love, not each other’s bodies. (See Plato’s Phaedrus)

So, it looks like to be happy, maybe one must ‘go Platonic’ and come to understand that it isn’t simply desire that pulls us through life in the right direction, it is RIGHT desire. In this case, it is a desire for edifying love, that may rarely include sex, but whose prominent characteristic is the mutual exploration of Love’s  IDEA, and striving to learn together, and affect the RIGHT IDEA together. That is, insofar as their co-presence constitutes a relationship, the relationship is grounded in a mutual desire, conversationally, to explore the question: What is love?

Now ask what love is for you: Is it the repetition of  lust’s fulfillment, or an eternal IDEA that enables you to KNOW whether you’ve met your soulmate and allows your soulmate to work out their understanding of the concept of love in a conversation, where participants bear the conversational burden, through Q&A toward discovering a mutually satisfying IDEA of love–an Idea of Love that one might trust because of its foundation in Truth and rejection of carnality.

  • Post your own disntinctio on the “Comments” page!
  • Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 200 schemes and tropes with their definitions and at least 2 examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for. Not only that, the examples of schemes and tropes may prompt you to try to create one scheme or trope per day, starting with abating.

 

Distributio

Distributio (dis-tri-bu’-ti-o): (1) Assigning roles among or specifying the duties of a list of people, sometimes accompanied by a conclusion.  (2) Sometimes this term is simply a synonym for diaeresis or merismus, which are more general figures involving division.

Here’s the breakdown: Pat, you take care of the garden hose. Nimmy, put the mower away. Joey, you go ahead and complain about how “labor intensive” it is to put things away.

By the way, your bedroom’s scattered worldly goods are crying out to be picked up and put away–but you ignore them. Listen to their pleading voices, and also, your laundry basket is tearfully telling you it feels “empty inside.”

No wonder! It is empty inside. Take pity on your laundry basket. Fill it up, carry it to the laundry room, put your laundry in the washer, let it wash. Dry it in the dryer and return it to its habitat: your bedroom closet, your bedroom  dresser, and the hook on the back of your bedroom door.

  • Post your own distributio on the “Comments” page!
  • A paper edition of The Daily Trope, entitled The Book of Tropes, is available for purchase on Amazon for $9.99 USD. It contains over 150 schemes and tropes with their definitions and at least 2 examples of each. All of the schemes and tropes are indexed, so it’s easy to find the one you’re looking for.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

 

Ecphonesis

Ecphonesis (ec-pho-nee’-sis): An emotional exclamation.

Pat: “I’m going crazy!”

Sam: “So am I! Let’s dance!”

  • Post your own ecphonesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Effictio

Effictio (ef-fik’-ti-o): A verbal depiction of someone’s body, often from head to toe.

Note: This figure was used in forensic rhetoric (legal argumentation) for purposes of clearly identifying an alleged criminal. It has often been adapted to poetical uses.

He was lying on his back in a pool of blood in the alleyway between the “Bar of Good Hope” and a hardware store. His head looked like a pumpkin that had been sitting on somebody’s porch steps for a month. It was caved in on both sides–mercilessly crushed by the assailant’s baseball bat, which was lying on the concrete walkway alongside the victim. The victim’s brown eyes had a dull film over them and the victim wasn’t breathing, leaving no doubt that he was dead. I checked his pulse anyway. Dead. Dead as can be.

He was around six feet-three inches tall with sandy blond hair. He was wearing a gold wedding band. In addition, he was wearing red shorts, a black T-shirt, and expensive jogging shoes. He was muscular–broad shoulders and sculpted biceps, flat stomach, and legs that looked like he could out-sprint anybody on the body-recovery team.

He had no identification, so he would be admitted to the morgue as “John Doe.” Perhaps the assailant stole his wallet, but the brutality of the beating, and leaving the murder weapon behind, indicate this was a crime of passion: of anger, of love gone bad, or one of the other seemingly endless motives involved in murder.

Next, we need to figure out who this dead guy is, and then, create a list of suspects, and haul them into the Station for interrogation.

It’s not going to be easy solving this one. But once it hits the press, we may get some leads. Also, we’ll be checking fingerprints.

  • Post your own effictio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Ellipsis

Ellipsis (el-lip’-sis): Omission of a word or short phrase easily understood in context.

There’s too much stuff piling up on the dining room table. Periodicals. Bills. Catalogs. Newspapers. Empty coffee mugs. Dead flowers. A bundt cake. Potato chips. Crackers. Empty wine bottle. And more.

We need to clear it off!

Who’s going to make the first move?

You help me, and I you.

  • Post your own ellipsis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print version of The Daily Trope! The print version is titled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99 (or less).

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

It snowed for three days as the temperature hovered around zero fahrenheit. Sadly, a small group of homeless people froze to death under the blanket of snow. Five people killed because of the snow and the temperature and our failure to find them and give them the option of being transported to one of the city’s many homeless shelters.

We need to be more proactive in finding homeless people and letting them know there are shelters and, if desired, taking them to one the shelters. Our city’s shelters are warm and their food is good. In addition to having a hot meal, there are beds and showers, and free laundromats.

We can’t ignore the the plight of homeless people. As human beings, they deserve our respect and support. So, keep an eye out for them and show them that we care by offering them assistance in finding and taking shelter.

Thank you.

  • Post your own enallage on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enantiosis

Enantiosis (e-nan-ti-o’-sis): Using opposing or contrary descriptions together, typically in a somewhat paradoxical manner.

Tonight, I will steal, yet be known as honorable.

For what I steal will be sold and the money distributed to those who really need it.

I am an honest and generous thief.

Call me “Robbing Hood.”

  • Post your own enantiosis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enigma

Enigma (e-nig’-ma): Obscuring one’s meaning by presenting it within a riddle or by means of metaphors that purposefully challenge the reader or hearer to understand.

Hey! Stop! Stay where you are and listen to my riddle:

“The more you take, the more you leave behind.”

What’s the answer to this riddle?

It’s footsteps: the more you take the more you leave behind.

Okay, be patient, I’m getting to my point and here it is:

When you come in after playing outside in the snow, stay on the tiled entryway until you’ve taken off  your boots! Then, when you step into the living room, walk across its carpet into the kitchen, and grab a snack out of the refrigerator,  all you’ll leave behind will be steps–not snowy, slushy or muddy footprints.

So, take the necessary step (ha ha): take off your boots before you step on the living room carpet.

  • Post your own enigma on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Ennoia

Ennoia (en-no’-i-a): A kind of purposeful holding back of information that nevertheless hints at what is meant. A kind of circuitous speaking.

The kitchen counter is covered with spillage from your most recent heartfelt attempt to make a figgy pudding (by the way, if I have to listen to any more Bing Crosby Christmas songs, I’m going to pull off my ears and feed them to our neighbor’s Wolf-a-poo).

Anyway, the counter-top cleanser is under the sink. You can see the sponges from where you’re standing, and the scrub brush (just in case) is under the sink too, next to the cleanser. There’s a huge roll of paper towels on the sink too.

But before I go to bed, let’s have some “figgy pudding and a cup of good cheer” and talk briefly about the “good tidings” Bing has supposedly brought us.

Here’s my problem: Bing has been making the “tidings”promise to me for the past 51 Christmases–and so far nothing’s shown up, either glad or sad, and to make things worse, Bing has been dead for awhile. Can he bring tidings from the other side? Maybe I don’t know what a “tiding” is? I’m going to look “tiding” up.

I looked it up!

What’s the point of singing about tidings–giving musical  announcements at Christmas in lieu of something more substantial:  I’d much rather have some cool driving gloves from Santa than an ‘announcement’ from Bing. The way it’s set up in the song, tidings are just an excuse to indulge in figgy pudding and alcoholic beverages. So Bing’s tiding is an excuse to eat a desert cake and down a few hot toddys. I guess that’s ok with me.

Merry Christmas! Good tidings to you (with a side order of cake and rum).

  • Post your own ennoia on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Enthymeme

Enthymeme (en’-thy-meem): 1. The informal method [or figure] of reasoning typical of rhetorical discourse. The enthymeme is sometimes defined as a “truncated syllogism” since either the major or minor premise found in that more formal method of reasoning is left implied. The enthymeme typically occurs as a conclusion coupled with a reason. When several enthymemes are linked together, this becomes sorites. 2.  A figure of speech which bases a conclusion on the truth of its contrary. [Depending on its grammatical structure and specific word choice, it may be chiasmus].

1. You better take an umbrella. It is raining outside. (Possible implied premises: you want to stay dry.  The umbrella will keep you dry because it is specifically designed to do so [if you use it properly].)

2. If virtue is an ideal that should be pursued, vice should be avoided. (Vice is contrary to virtue.)

  • Post your own enthymeme on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Epanodos

Epanodos (e-pan’-o-dos): 1. Repeating the main terms of an argument in the course of presenting it. 2. Returning to the main theme after a digression. 3. Returning to and providing additional detail for items mentioned previously (often using parallelism).

I am not sure where all the vote recounting is taking us, or even why it is being done. It’s a waste of time and money.

We started out conversing about recounts when Trump ‘threatened’ a recount if he didn’t win the election. His ‘threat’ was characterized as more or less unsportsmanlike–at any rate as somehow wrong and maybe even a little whacky.

Now, a recount is being undertaken. Surely the Green Party candidate does not expect to pull out victories in Wisconsin and  Pennsylvania. But we hear whispers that the Democratic candidate is helping sponsor the recounts too–again I say: I’m not sure where all the vote recounting is taking us, or even why it is being done. It is a waste of time and money.

I will be shocked and probably die of a heart attack if anything changes with the election as a result of the recounts. I think I heard today that 5,000 votes for Trump were found in Wisconsin  that shouldn’t have gone to him. That puts a mini-dent (a tiny pock mark) in the 20-something thousand he won by in Wisconsin.

Bottom line: What’s the point. Somebody tell me why we’re recounting votes? 5,000 misappropriated votes don’t answer the question.

But hey–if you play the lotto: “You never know.” Who knows, maybe there will be a miracle and Clinton will take Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.

Ha ha! Fat chance. The recount is pointless. It is a waste of time and money.

  • Post your own epanodos on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epanorthosis

Epanorthosis (ep-an-or-tho’-sis): Amending a first thought by altering it to make it stronger or more vehement.

The American people anxiously await the outcome as President-elect Trump works to put his cabinet together.

Or put another way: The American people are pooping in their pants as they await the outcome and pray that WWIII can be averted  as Trump announces his Cabinet appointees.

  • Post your own epanorthosis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epenthesis

Epenthesis (e-pen’-thes-is): The addition of a letter, sound, or syllable to the middle of a word. A kind of metaplasmNoteEpenthesis is sometimes employed in order to accommodate meter in verse; sometimes, to facilitate easier articulation of a word’s sound. It can, of course, be accidental, and a vice of speech.

What happened to the good old days? Back when we j-a-umped for joy at the smallest provocation. Now, I’d doubt if I’d even jump for joy if I won the lottery.

Joy is priceless and jumping for joy is divine–it’s like an angel trying out its wings.

  • Post your own epenthesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epergesis

Epergesis (e-per-gee’-sis): Interposing an apposition, often in order to clarify what has just been stated.

My Cow, Two-ton Nellie, just had two calves. We just thought she was big! What a surprise! Even the vet didn’t catch it. Hmmm. I wonder, given his supposed expertise, what what wrong.

Well, it does not matter. Everybody’s healthy and we’ve renamed Two-ton Nellie, Half-ton Nellie. We think she likes her new name!

We’ve named the calves Popeye and Bluto–yup, they are little baby bulls.

  • Post your own epergesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epexegesis

Epexegesis (ep-ex-e-ge’-sis): When one interprets what one has just said. A kind of redefinition or self-interpretation (often signaled by constructions such as “that is to say. . .”).

There is nothing more important than the truth. That is, the truth is rooted in fact, and facts are real. If we ignore the truth under any circumstances, we risk far more than the small effect of a menial once-told lie. That is to say, truth keeps us from harm. Errors are to be expected, but once told, the truth must stand until a good reason is brought to bear that will motivate “us” to reject it.

I use the term “us” with a cautionary note: some other “us” is “them” to “us,” as far as “they” may not be willing at act upon what “we” take to be self-evidently true. That is, truth must be believed to be acted upon: where belief is lacking , a given “truth” has no status as such–as a motive to action it is void.

  • Post your own epexegesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epicrisis

Epicrisis (e-pi-cri’-sis): When a speaker quotes a certain passage and makes comment upon it.

Related figuresanamenesis–calling to memory past matters. More specifically, citing a past author from memory–and chreia (from the Greek chreiodes, “useful”) . . . “a brief reminiscence referring to some person in a pithy form for the purpose of edification.” It takes the form of an anecdote that reports either a saying, an edifying action, or both.

Aristotle tells us “Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.”

If this quote is accurate, it may shed light on ancient ideas of the threesome: “I’ll be the soul, you two be the bodies. Let’s go!”

  • Post your own epicrisis on the “Comments” page!

Definitions courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epilogus

Epilogus (e-pi-lo’-gus): Providing an inference of what is likely to follow.

There is no room for optimism. There will not be a mending of fences. There will be a wall. The end.

  • Post your own epilogus on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epimone

Epimone (e-pi’-mo-nee): Persistent repetition of the same plea in much the same words.

Be patient. Have patience. Relax. Don’t rush. Cool your jets. Wait a couple of months before you apply for Canadian citizenship. Who knows? Maybe this will somehow all work out for the better.

Hmmmmm. Probably not.

Fasten your seat belts. Adjust your mirrors. Start your engines. Roll up your windows. On to Canada!

  • Post your own epimone on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epiplexis (e-pi-plex’-is): Asking questions in order to chide, to express grief, or to inveigh. A kind of rhetorical question [–the speaker does not expect an answer].

When will we stop hearing about those ‘Clinton’ emails? When the internet is destroyed? When Trump has his mouth sewn shut?

  • Post your own epiplexis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Epitrope

Epitrope (e-pi’-tro-pe): A figure in which one turns things over to one’s hearers, either pathetically, ironically, or in such a way as to suggest a proof of something without having to state it. Epitrope often takes the form of granting permission (hence its Latin name, permissio), submitting something for consideration, or simply referring to the abilities of the audience to supply the meaning that the speaker passes over (hence Puttenham’s term, figure of reference). Epitrope can be either biting in its irony, or flattering in its deference.

A specific form of epitrope is the (apparent) admission of what is wrong in order to carry your point.

Go ahead, stay home on Election Day! It’s no big deal. Why bother to vote? Who cares! It’s rigged anyway. It’s all about who has the most money and who’s the most corrupt.

Yeah–that’s right: Stay home on Election Day. It’s no big deal. Be an idiot. Throw away your opportunity to change things.

Sucker!

  • Post your own epitrope on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epizeugma

Epizeugma (ep-i-zoog’-ma): Placing the verb that holds together the entire sentence (made up of multiple parts that depend upon that verb) either at the very beginning or the very ending of that sentence.

There is nothing like time’s rush.

Being free, patience waits.

Waiting, without rushing to wait, time passes.

  • Post your own epizeugma on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)