Tag Archives: climax

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

Once again, too soon after the previous ‘once again’, there was a gun and there were bullets. There was shooting and mass killing.

First I am shocked. Then I am saddened. Then I feel anger that turns into outrage.

What can I do? What can you do? What can we do? What can anybody do?

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (www.rhetoric.byu.edu)

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

I woke up this morning to the ongoing media drumbeat–thump, thump, thump, we must dump Trump.

The radio says investigate him, question him, impeach him.

The Facebook news feeds say investigate him, question him, impeach him.

Twitter says investigate him, question him, impeach him.

Many Democrats say investigate him, question him, impeach him.

Most Republicans say nothing at all, except to complain about the “leaks” from the intelligence community–primarily CIA and NSA.

Bear this in mind: Republicans aren’t accusing CIA and NSA of lying. Rather they are accusing them of leaking.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (www.rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

Swinging in his hammock under the silver moon, he reminded me of a ferret–a nervous, lazy, lounger dreaming of a roosterless chicken coop overflowing with plump, juicy, sweet little slumbering hens.

Or:

She flies jets, butchers deer, tends a garden, drinks Jim Beam, wears Honey Oud Eau de Parfum, plays acoustic 12-string guitar, loves fireworks, has a black green-eyed catand fends for herself, and I love her.

Or:

The first snow of winter came today. Dreadful, damned, careless snow.

When I was a kid I loved it, played in it, built castles out of it, made money shoveling it, sledded in it, packed it into balls and threw it, made angels in it, poured maple syrup on it and ate it, made snowmen out of it, and never got tired of it.

Now, I have to drive in it and possibly die in it on some lonely stretch of back road hell, spinning sideways over a cliff or flipping over into a ditch, or hitting a tree or a deer staring at me.

Snow

Then: Fun and games. Now: old-age and pains.

Joy turns to fear, beaten down year by year by the hammer of being here.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

Beauty attracts the soul, the soul opens the mind, the mind imagines a world of passion, peace and happiness.

Happiness is the worship of beauty.

Happiness is a prayer to Eros uttered by mind-voicing to a joyous soul, transfixed by the idea, transfigured by the word, and multiplied by their coupling as form and matter: thought and sound.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

Morning arrives and I hear your name. It drums on my head like icy rain.

It pounds my soul in cold dark streams. It smothers what’s left of my heart’s dreams.

Yes, the fire is out but I still see your name. Written in the charred rubble of what feelings remain.

Over and over I burn and I freeze.  My love for you has become a disease.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was a big, tall, towering nightmare. A screamer. A yeller. A beligerant blunt-force human trauma.  He never backed down. He never gave way. He got hit by a Fedex truck. Then, he hit the Fedex truck, sued, won, and moved to Belize.

Or:

He’s a father, brother, son, husband, uncle, cousin, nephew, and grandson. He’s connected 8 ways to his family, but only one way to his friends!

Or:

In summer, he spent his afternoons rolling cigarettes in the garage and “looking for things.” He would ride up and down the driveway for hours on “Phony” his minature pony.

At night he would go out in the yard, pull down his pants, and hop up and down until he fell over.

Every morning he would get up, go to the kitchen, stick his butt in the microwave, and crow like a rooster.  Then, he would boil water, make tea, throw a cupfull on the rubber portrait of King George III in the bottom of the sink and yell “Party on that Georgie boy.” His favorite breakfast was a pancake ham sandwich dipped in a bowl of warm Amarula.

It was during the fall, winter, and spring that he worked at night in his office, and during the day, in his laboratory in Washington, D.C. He was an inventer. He had 16,211 patents.  He made Thomas Edison look like a tinker. He earned well over $3,000,000 per year in royalties for things like his “How Now Snow Plow,” “Karmic Bath Towel,” and “Chunky Tuna Maker.”

In short, the guy was different. He marched to the color of a different crayon. He thought outside of the outside. He was a beggar and a chooser. He was a comma without a clause.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Congeries

Congeries (con’ger-eez): Piling up words of differing meaning but for a similar emotional effect [(akin to climax)].

Homes and highways damaged and destroyed. Friends and loved ones missing and dead.

Yesterday we were in schock. Today, we mourn. Tomorrow, we will begin to rebuild.

In the weeks, months, and years to come we will work, rejoice, remember, struggle, and seek solace in the spirit of hope that joins us and speeds us ahead.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was cruel, vicious, wicked, violent. A monster. A killer. A human stain! He got what he deserved. Now that he’s dead, we can put our lives back together again.

Or:

He’s a robber, a philanthropist, a farmer, a preacher, a sinner, a gambler, a winner, a saint, a liar, and my best friend. Am I in trouble?

Or:

In summer, he spent his days digging worms and feeding them to Ed (his pet Robin), practicing his acrobatics (he loved cartwheels and backflips), knitting what he called “nose warmers,” and sometimes pushing a shopping cart around in the basement, pretending he was at the grocery store and complaining about the cost of bread and milk and caviar.

At night he would go into the woods behind his home, strip naked, pound his chest, and spit at the starry sky.

Every morning he would get up, go to the kitchen, put his left hand in the toaster oven and sing the theme song from the musical “Annie.” Then, he would put two slices of bread into the toaster oven, turn it on, and wait. When the toast was ready, he took it out of the toaster oven, held one piece in each hand over his head and yelled (in French), “Let them eat cake!”

It was during the fall, winter, and spring that he worked at night in his office, and during the day, in his laboratory at M.I.T. He had won two Nobel Prizes in two entirely different fields: Physics and Literature. His teaching evaluations were through the roof. Over the course of his career he had landed nearly $20,000,000 worth of grants to support his scholarly and creative endeavors.

In short, the guy was a totally weird Nobel Prize winning genius nutcase. Not only that, he was my father and our whole family loved him. So did his colleagues. If only they knew!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Correctio

Correctio (cor-rec’-ti-o): The amending of a term or phrase just employed; or, a further specifying of meaning, especially by indicating what something is not (which may occur either before or after the term or phrase used). A kind of redefinition, often employed as a parenthesis (an interruption) or as a climax.

This is war. It’s not a threat, a nightmare, or some stupid kid’s macho video game. This is about killing, killing, more killing, and much, much more filthy, disgusting, remorseless, relentless, unforgettable, stench-filled, shrieking killing.  This is war. Let’s go! Let’s kill! Let’s do the right thing!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

It’s unfair, unjust, and inequitable! It’s not morally right! It’s cheating! It’s  peddling lies! It’s pedaling on EPO! Lance Armstrong, loser of his own Tour de Farce!

Or

He shoved. He hugged. He closed his eyes. He ran. He stopped. He sat. He listened. He cleared his throat. He tied his shoe. It was a boot. It was a balloon. He woke up. It was his birthday.

Or

We were grateful for the shelter. We trusted the soldiers who had led us there. We prayed for our brothers and sisters who died without warning in the catastrophe’s wake. Gratitude, trust, and prayer drew us together and cradled our grief, and softened the blows of despair.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Auxesis

Auxesis (ok-see’-sis): (1) Arranging words or clauses in a sequence of increasing force. In this sense, auxesis is comparable to climax and has sometimes been called incrementum.  (2) A figure of speech in which something is referred to in terms disproportionately large (a kind of exaggeration or hyperbole). (3) Amplification in general.

(1) First it was a protest, then it was a revolution, now it is a civil war.

70,000 killed and countless victims living in misery: hungry, horrified and maimed. Where’s the Red Line? In Obama’s head? In the bloodstains on the streets of Damascus? On Satan’s tachometer? Or, on the flatlined puffy faces of the UN’s living dead?

(2) The world’s tribulations churn in whirlpools of misery–from Mali to Manhattan spinning in the wake of speedy Catastrophe: Hell’s flagship luxury liner.

The Brochure: “Powered by Greed and commanded by Captain Temerity! Stow your immortal souls below, cast off all hope, and lose the 21st century! Enjoy the cruise–it lasts for eternity!”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

 

Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

If debating is something you don’t enjoy it will show through your delivery, delivery induces the audience’s sense of your sincerity, sincerity lays a foundation for trust, trust wins elections.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

There is the kindling, the spark, the flame and the light that faces our fears and and befriends us at night.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Congeries

Congeries (con’-ger-eez): Piling up words of differing meaning but for a similar emotional effect [(akin to climax)].

Your proposal is unrealistic, dangerous, insulting, immoral, and muddled.  In short, it’s ready for the shredder.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was generous, kind, and open minded.  He had a heart of gold. He followed the Golden Rule. He was a saint.

Or

He stole. He gave. He won. He lost. He begged. He prospered. He failed. He succeeded. He lived a chaotic life. All extremes. No middles.

Or

In sum, the regulators failed to regulate, the engineers made no meaningful provisions for catastrophic failure, tremendous corporate profits were made, and now it’s time for all of you to pay–to pay for the laws that were wantonly broken, to pay for the colossal lack of oversight in implementing technologies without prudent consideration of consequences and safeguards, and most importantly, to pay for the environmental devastation you caused, and the lives that you have upturned, ruptured, and taken.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

Hope sets it sights on the future. The future is filled with possibility. Possibility sets hope in action. In action, hope is realized.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

We went from caring to despairing, to repairing, to sharing the best days (and nights) of our lives!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Auxesis

Auxesis (ok-see’-sis): (1) Arranging words or clauses in a sequence of increasing force. In this sense, auxesis is comparable to climax and has sometimes been called incrementum.  (2) A figure of speech in which something is referred to in terms disproportionately large (a kind of exaggeration or hyperbole). (3) Amplification in general.

(1) I am worried by the fact that he’s running for office. I am frightened by the possibility that he may win the primary. I am terrified by what may happen if he actually gets elected.

(2) I love that little deli–they put a million slices of corned beef on their reubens!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Congeries

Congeries (con’ger-eez): Piling up words of differing meaning but for a similar emotional effect [(akin to climax)].

You are my generous, intelligent, kind, creative, loving, self-confident buddy! My child! My daughter! My rainbow!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

She was smart, intelligent, brilliant.  She was a genius!

Or:

He was crazy, lazy, wealthy, wicked, and wonderful–he was my father!

Or:

This 30-year-old yo-yo stole $500 and 10 lotto tickets from his grandmother! His 82-year-old grandmother! His own flesh and blood! She raised him.  She fed him. She clothed him. She loaned him money. She nursed him back to health when he nearly died from a motorcycle accident! In short, she’s always loved him like she was his own mother. And what did he do in return?  He climbed through her bedroom window one warm summer night, scared her half to death with this ski mask pulled over his face, and stole her cash–her rent and her grocery money–and her lotto tickets too!

In sum, this loser wrote the book on shameless self-absorbed hateful greed–he is a model of wanton sleaze–a perfect picture of ingratitude–a paradigm of criminal treachery!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Climax

Climax (cli’-max): Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure.

Every person, every city, every state, and every nation is a facet of the same shining gem–circling the sun in numbered orbits–circling toward the end.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)