Category Archives: enallage

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

It snowed for three days as the temperature hovered around zero fahrenheit. Sadly, a small group of homeless people froze to death under the blanket of snow. Five people killed because of the snow and the temperature and our failure to find them and give them the option of being transported to one of the city’s many homeless shelters.

We need to be more proactive in finding homeless people and letting them know there are shelters and, if desired, taking them to one the shelters. Our city’s shelters are warm and their food is good. In addition to having a hot meal, there are beds and showers, and free laundromats.

We can’t ignore the the plight of homeless people. As human beings, they deserve our respect and support. So, keep an eye out for them and show them that we care by offering them assistance in finding and taking shelter.

Thank you.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

The rain in Phoenix fell and fell and fell.  Drenched with nearly 2 inches of H2O, Interstate 17 closed, the airport closed, and 31,000 suburban Phonecians lost their electricity.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

Today, a burst of winter weather is slowing the whole US–from Maine to Montana, from Phoenix to Tallahassee–an icer snower fogger blower.

Now, let’s see what’s happening in your neck of the woods!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

When the buzz on the street says the future price of honey’s not sweet and there’s a strong likelihood he’ll be stung by a major market correction, alas, the worried beekeeper must sadly ask:

To be a beekeeper or not to be a beekeeper?

And in his anguish, he may cry out again:

Not to be a beekeeper or to be a beekeeper?

We hope that for the time being, for the bees’ sake, he decides to keep being a beekeeper, keep his bees, and be ready to go back to business as usual when the price of honey rebounds.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

Government service is not a vocation–it’s an executive management position. It’s a job! The President is the CEO of the United States of America.

I want to be CEO of the United States of America! CEO of the United States of America is what I want to be!

I’ve been there! I’ve made lots of money! Economic virtues are political virtues. Make me your Capitalist-in-Chief!

Hire me! Vote for me! Invest in me! America’s stock will climb!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Enallage

Enallage (e-nal’-la-ge): The substitution of grammatically different but semantically equivalent constructions.

I climbed that mountain. That mountain was climbed by me!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)