Category Archives: hendiadys

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.


Ham and eggs: on a menu, in your mouth, soft yolks, crispy edges, maybe some home fries with lots ketchup. More delicious than my favorite candy—Good and Plenty, plenty good. Little pink and white candies, licorice, and looked like pills. They were advertised on 1950s TV in an 8-foot long box. I wanted a box like it so badly, but that was not to be. Instead, I would try and make my own giant Good and Plenty candy box. “This is nice sweet candy,” I thought as I went foraging for cardboard. My thoughts and licorice smells were my incentive.

I hung out by the appliance store and my hopes were fulfilled. A refrigerator box came flying off the loading dock and landed by my feet. I dragged the giant box home and went to work. I used all of my mom’s pink lipstick to write “Good and Plenty” on both sides of the box. Now the box had a perfume smell and my hands were stained “Perky Pink,” the color of Mom’s lipstick. Now, I had to fill the box with candy—a daunting task. I didn’t know what to do. So, I went and talked to Grandpa. He said, “if you want them candies bad enough, steal the money from your ma’s purse. Don’t beg her for it—we both know she hates being begged at. Just take it!” So I did—took and pocketed $78.00. I went and arrived at the candy store around 4.00 pm. I plunked my money down and told mister Floger that I wanted every Good & Plenty he had. He brought three cases of the candy out from the back room and set them on the floor. Luckily, I had thought to bring my red wagon. I loaded it up and pulled it home. When I got home, I was shocked to see my candy box burning in the fire pit—like trash! I went berserk and tried to choke my mother on Good & Plenty candies. Our neighbor called the police and I was hauled off to jail. I was tried as a juvenile and convicted of attempted manslaughter. My mother hasn’t given up on me and sends me a box of Good and Plenty (plenty good) every month.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

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Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.


Tooth and nail. They went at it “tooth and nail”? What? Somebody must’ve landed at the dentist’s. Maybe it was a saw. They have teeth, and two people with saws and nails, fighting it out, would certainly project a discomfiting image of conflict. If I was in that fight I’d much rather be going “spike and tooth” than using only a 4d box nail. You can’t do much damage with a box nail—poke out an eye, scratch the skin or get in little stabs that may, in their sum, be fatal. Anyway, there’s room for improvement in the image. How about “They went at it saw and nail?” Better, how about “They want at it chain saw and nail gun?”

Now we’re getting somewhere: severed limbs, nails like porcupine quills sticking out of each other’s heads. That’s the stuff great movies are made of. Just think: Warriors carrying nail guns and chain saws go up against marauding hordes of Neolithic-looking madmen carrying only clubs and flimsy animal skin shields. But they have a secret weapon: jumping dogs with teeth like sabers and claws like daggers. Only the size of Chihuahuas, they jump on your head, tear off the top, and eat your brains. The only defense is a well-placed nail or a sweeping pass with a chain saw at full rev.

Sadly, the Neolithic-looking hordes will win. Their leader Clogloo will hold up a bloody pate bowl and drink the steaming grey goop from it chanting “Winners and losers, win and lose.”


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.

I’m tired and beat to the ass. We’ve been driving three days nonstop. I don’t think our dog having puppies back home is that big a deal. We could’ve watched it on Skype and encouraged her. And how can your mother predict five days before that the puppies are on the way? Sounds sketchy to me. They are nutty and crazy and I wouldn’t put it past them to pull some weirdness just to get us to come home early. I need to pull over and rest, or why don’t you drive for awhile? We’re almost there.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

 

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.

I’m lonely and mad. I wish I could have a bunch of friends and pals. I guess I need to deal with my anger before I will have a bunch of friends and pals–or maybe having a bunch of friends and pals would make my anger go away–damn and double-damn: I’m stuck and frustrated!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.

I’m sick and tired of  beginnings and endings.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force.

Without star and spangles and spectacles, parties’ political conventions wouldn’t be political conventions. Silly hats, confetti, fog horns, and Tele-prompted speeches! That’s what it’s all about.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force. Hendiadys can be considered a specific application of anthimeria, the more general term indicating the substitution of one part of speech for another.  Hendiadys [is realted to polysyndeton–it] increases the use of conjunctions in a sentence in the very act of transforming an adjective-noun combination into two nouns. [In addition,] making an adjective a noun changes it from a subordinate to an ordinate or parallel position, inviting one to consider the nouns as related but distinct. Like hendiadysparadiastole divides out and distinguishes terms normally considered completely consistent with one another.

Noise on dust and smell! The thousands; the wildebeest are on the move.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force. Hendiadys can be considered a specific application of anthimeria, the more general term indicating the substitution of one part of speech for another.  Hendiadys [is realted to polysyndeton–it] increases the use of conjunctions in a sentence in the very act of transforming an adjective-noun combination into two nouns. [In addition,] making an adjective a noun changes it from a subordinate to an ordinate or parallel position, inviting one to consider the nouns as related but distinct. Like hendiadys, paradiastole divides out and distinguishes terms normally considered completely consistent with one another.

In the US on the night of July 4th, everywhere the sky will be filled with fireworks and boom!

vs.

In the US on the night of July 4th, everywhere the sky will be filled with booming fireworks!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (hen-di’-a-dis): Expressing a single idea by two nouns [joined by a conjunction] instead of a noun and its qualifier. A method of amplification that adds force. Hendiadys can be considered a specific application of anthimeria, the more general term indicating the substitution of one part of speech for another.  Hendiadys [is realted to polysyndeton–it] increases the use of conjunctions in a sentence in the very act of transforming an adjective-noun combination into two nouns. [In addition,] making an adjective a noun changes it from a subordinate to an ordinate or parallel position, inviting one to consider the nouns as related but distinct. Like hendiadys, paradiastole divides out and distinguishes terms normally considered completely consistent with one another.

It wasn’t the sparkle, or the diamonds, or the two rings that made that night a special night–it was the commitment we exchanged.

vs.

It wasn’t the two sparkling diamond rings that made that night a special night–it was the commitment we exchanged.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.