Category Archives: dianoea

Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).


What is love? Unconditional affection. He says he loved his wife. Is cutting her throat with a steak knife love? No, it’s not. is it justifiable? No. She didn’t attack him. She didn’t try to poison him. She never cheated on him. She was asleep in her bed after a long day of cleaning, taking care of the five kids, making lunch, cooking dinner, and mowing the lawn, and dutifully taking the sleeping pills he gave her. Was she able to defend herself as her husband put the knife to her throat? No. She was sound asleep—possibly a drug-induced sleep. Did she have a chance? No. Did he do it? Yes. His fingerprints are on the knife and one of his children saw him do it. Why did he do it? Sadly, in his twisted mind it was cheaper and easier to murder her than to get a divorce. He had told his neighbor that he freaked out when his attorney told him what it would cost, and that he would lose nearly everything. Does this sound like a motive for choosing an alternative to divorce? Yes it does,


And what triggered the murder, what started the ball rolling? Adultery. He had fallen into the slime pit of an extramarital affair with a considerably younger woman—only two years older than his eldest daughter. He felt trapped between the old and the new. The stale and the fresh. The plodding consistent love of his wife, and the fireworks display of his young mistresses body, her endless adulation, and her cheerful, good-natured demeanor. Is the possible contrast between wife and mistress a good reason for him to contemplate murdering his wife? No. It is about the pathological desire to have his way and seeing his wife’s murder as more cost effective than divorce. It is about narcissism and the blindfold of total self-interest making him unable to gauge the consequences of his actions. He killed her in their bed where their children were conceived. And one of their children witnessed what he did. She will be traumatized for the rest of her life. If it wasn’t for the child, he would’ve escaped. He punched his little daughter in the face as he went out the bedroom door, and he told her to keep her mouth shut, or she was next.

There is no love here. There’s only deception, indecency, brutality, murder and the absolute destruction of a little girl’s life.

Where should this man go next? I vote for some kind of medieval torture chamber, but here in New York, we’ll have to settle for a conviction and a prison sentence. Life in prison without parole? Yes. This man is a murdering fiend with no redeeming qualities.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).


It’s never too late. What the hell does that mean? Grandma’s dead and I never told her I loved her.

So what?

I didn’t have to say it.

It’s what I did. I bought her a new bedpan when she was in the nursing home. I paid back most of the money I borrowed from her. I sold her dog and made some extra money for her. I bought her a nice used walker. Jeez, I paid for her cremation even! So what if she was already dead when she was turned to ashes—she watched from heaven. Right?

Did I do enough? Did I care more than anybody? Did I give more than anybody? Is my conscience clear? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.

I’m off the hook—free and clear—out of the red—rising like a Phoenix. It’s time to go to the reading of Grandma’s will. I’m glad we were able to make some minor deathbed revisions a couple of hours before she died.

Am I a soulless crook? No! I am deserving—deserving of everything!

Hans Christian Anderson wrote: “Death walks faster than the wind and never returns what he has taken.” Grandma had a lot of wind in her final hours, but Death was faster. Now, let’s find out what she left me (I already know).


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

A print edition of The Daily Trope is available from Amazon for $9.95. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).

What’s the matter with me? Nothing’s the matter with me. What’s the matter with you? Nothing’s the matter with you.

This is the question: What’s the matter with us? We need to take mutual responsibility for our relationship.

Is it me? No!

Is it you? No!

It’s us! We need to figure out together what we need to do next.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

A print edition of The Daily Trope is available from Amazon for $9.95. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).

Where was I last night? Where do you think I was? In a hot tub? At a banquet? Relaxing in the Presidential suite at Trump Towers?

WRONG! WRONG! WRONG!

SURPRISE! Despite having a green card and living in the US  for the past 5 years, what do you think happened? You’re right: I was detained at JFK & slept on the floor last night. Now, I’m quite hungry! I’m trying to get home to my wife and two baby daughters. They live in New Jersey.

Thank you so much for the displays of solidarity & for the legal assistance.

Wish me luck!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).

Where was I last night? Where do you think I was? In the garage? In the recycling bin? In your closet listening to you and my best friend Ed making the bed squeak? What do you take me for? A fool? An idiot? A patsy? An overgrown carrot?  A piece of carry-on luggage? A horse’s ass?

I’m a what?  A lost Fedex driver with guitar strings in his pants and an unaddressed package wrapped in panty hose bouncing around under his seat? Yes! Yes! Yes! That’s me!

Do you want to know what’s in that package? Do you care whether it’s Ed’s head, or a bundt cake, or a tambourine? You have one guess and you better be right! What? Emptiness? The emptiness of our lives together? Bah!

WRONG!

SURPRISE! It’s a tambourine, and yes! Yes indeed! That is Ed’s face stretched across the frame! Want a piece of bundt cake? Come on!  Let’s sing!  “Hey Mr. Tambourine Man play a song for me. . . . “

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Dianoea

Dianoea (di-a-noe’-a): The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora).

Have no fear hubby’s here! And well . . . What did I do on Friday? I went to the mall for four hours! What did I do on Saturday? I made reservations for dinner at your favorite restaurant! What about Sunday? I contacted all your friends to invite them over tonight. And how about right now? I made you breakfast in bed (with this juicy little Rolex on the side)! You are my number one! There’s no way I want it any other way. You are the love of my life! You are the best! Happy birthday dear wife! Today’s your day! Your wish is my command.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)