Category Archives: coenotes

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

I am not going to leave. I need to be here–to watch TV and enjoy your cooking too! I will never go.

I am not going to leave. You need me to support you. You need the money I earn to make the mortgage payment and pay for the car and all the crap you bought on the internet. I will never go.

I am not going to leave. I don’t care what you say. We are a perfect couple. We compliment each other: I like staying home & you like going out. You are a vegetarian & I love meat. I like bowling & you think it sucks. I watch Fox News & you watch MSNBC. We are a perfect couple. I will never go.

You’re filing for a restraining order? Well, on that note, I guess it’s time to go.

You can find me again on Facebook when you realize what a mistake you’ve made!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency.  The Republic depends on truth as a central source of sustenance. The Republic can become weak and collapse under the weight of misrepresentations made by political actors.

Again, lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency. Now, what’s the difference between a lie and a factually incorrect statement that you know is factually incorrect, but you represent as true? Answer: None.

So, is President Trump lying about the busloads of illicit voters who invaded NH from MA and affected the election? Or, does he actually believe it’s true?

If he believes it’s true, he is currently the most gullible person on planet Earth. He has taken up the belief with no evidence. There must be an advisor in the White House he trusts more than God!

Which is worse: being a liar or being mega-gullible–being easily duped?

I think President Trump is lying–and never forget:

Lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency and the Republic can become weak and collapse under the weight of misrepresentations made by political actors.

Good riddance Flynn.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Give me a break!

You still don’t believe I love you? Wait to you see what I got you for Valentines Day! Voila!

You still don’t believe I love you? But the hairbrush is made out of wood with real pig bristles! Ok! Ok! Relax! Here we go! Take Two. Voila!

You still don’t believe I love you? But you’ve always wanted a super-wide Swedish spatula! Wait! Wait! Ok. Well, here’s the clincher! Voila!

Yes, yes, yes, now you know I love you! Yes–your very own Fifty Shades of Grey “Please, Sir Flogger!” Now you know why I gave you a hairbrush and a spatula too!

Yup!

Hanky panky spanky time!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

 

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

You’re already covered with tasteless tats! You promised me the bowling ball with your mother’s face on it was the last chapter in the incoherent mess plastered all over your skin! Now Cheepy? Jeez! Your body’s a Rorschach of impulsive mistakes!

You’re already covered with tasteless tats! Poor little Cheepy inked on your hand! I know you feel guilty because you stepped on Cheepy.  If you must do a new tattoo, why not just have “BIGGEST IMPULSIVE MISTAKE EVER” tattooed on your forehead?  It’ll title your skin’s story and give meaning to the mess! Why not? Your body’s a Rorschach of impulsive mistakes!

Go for it!

Oh, wait a minute, putting a caption on your head will de-Rorschach the rest of your skin! Besides, it won’t be an impulsive mistake–it’s even worse–it’ll be a calculated mistake!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Hear me! We have journeyed a long, long way. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! Our map is faith and our hope moves our tired feet. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! We are going home to the place to rest, to break bread, to call our own! I can feel it! We are almost home!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophe, coenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

When will we get a new cell phone? When it has all the features we actually need.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

When will we get a new cell phone? When there’s enough coverage to enable us to call from anywhere to anywhere.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophe, coenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

What is the purpose of government? To manage the state’s finances; always to serve the res publica.What is the purpose of government? To enact, revise, and enforce the law; always to serve the res publica.

What is the purpose of government? To raise, equip, and train an effective fighting force; always to serve the res publica.

What is the purpose of government? Always, to serve the res publica!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)