Coenotes


Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency.  The Republic depends on truth as a central source of sustenance. The Republic can become weak and collapse under the weight of misrepresentations made by political actors.

Again, lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency. Now, what’s the difference between a lie and a factually incorrect statement that you know is factually incorrect, but you represent as true? Answer: None.

So, is President Trump lying about the busloads of illicit voters who invaded NH from MA and affected the election? Or, does he actually believe it’s true?

If he believes it’s true, he is currently the most gullible person on planet Earth. He has taken up the belief with no evidence. There must be an advisor in the White House he trusts more than God!

Which is worse: being a liar or being mega-gullible–being easily duped?

I think President Trump is lying–and never forget:

Lying politicians pose a significant threat to our nation’s solvency and the Republic can become weak and collapse under the weight of misrepresentations made by political actors.

Good riddance Flynn.

  • Post your own coenotes on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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