Category Archives: expeditio

Expeditio

Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational pattern of arguments]).

Why did you vote for Donald Trump?

1. You thought he could get things done?

2. You thought he was going to make life better for you?

or

3. He is honest and trustworthy?

Three strikes! He has turned out to be none of the above. Just read the papers!

(Oh, that’s right–the truth is fake news.)

Maybe you need to reassess your motives and prepare for the next election! There are actually politicians who exemplify the virtues you are looking for. Look for those politicians! Vote for those politicians. Forget about Trump. He is a big phony.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text by Gorgias.

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Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational pattern of arguments]).

Me: Why are you going to school today?

1. To hang out with friends?

2. To make trouble?

or

3. To learn something?

Number One is a waste of time. Number Two is a total disaster. That leaves number three–learning is school’s purpose!

So, “to learn something” is why you’re going to school today. Right?

You: Yes, Ma.

Me: Good! You’re on your way to fame and fortune!

You: Yes, Ma.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text

Expeditio

Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational patterns of arguments]).

Me: Why did you get a tattoo of a garage door opener on the right cheek of your butt? Wait, wait, don’t tell me! Knowing you, I think there are three possible reasons: 1. Donny Osmond has one.  I know for a fact that Donny has no tattoos on his butt (check out the YouTube video), so that’s out. 2. Your ‘little friends’ ordered you to do it. You’ve been taking your medication, so that’s out. 3. You acted on random impulse.  Since you’ve spent your life doing things without without considering their consequences (e.g. when you amputated your pinky), I’m going with option 3: random impulse, right?

You: I did what to my butt?

  • Post your own expeditio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text

Expeditio

Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational patterns of arguments]).

Where did you get that beautiful diamond ring? No, don’t tell me–let me guess. Either you bought it, found it, stole it, or somebody gave it to you.  Now, let’s see . . . There’s no way you’d buy something like that for yourself–you’re the cheapest person I know.  If you found it, I know you’d would’ve handed it over to lost and found–at any rate you wouldn’t be showing it off like it’s yours–you’d be telling everybody you found it and you’d be looking for its owner. There’s no way you’d ever steal anything–I’ve known you since we were kids. So, all I can say is: Who gave it to you? What’s up? Wow! Life is good!

  • Post your own expeditio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.