Tag Archives: apophasis

Apophasis

Apophasis (a-pof’-a-sis): The rejection of several reasons why a thing should or should not be done and affirming a single one, considered most valid.

Should I get another hamster?

1. No–I have too many hamsters all ready–7 should be enough!

2. No–there’s a constant sound of hamster wheels whirling in the background of my life. Adding more will drive me insane.

3. No–their health insurance is astronomical: $22.00 with a huge deductible for the MetLife Rodent Plan.

4. No–they are very prolific–I have to have separate cages for males and females.

Ah, what the hell. I think I’ll get 3 more. The way they look at me with their big bulgy dark eyes makes all their drawbacks fade into nothing!

Headed to the Pet Store! I’ll buy some hamster food & definitely some of those little hamster hats too!

Uh oh–last problem: I’m running out of names.

I’ll start using numbers!

Problem solved!

Eight, Nine, and Ten, I’m coming to get you!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Apophasis

Apophasis (a-pof’-a-sis): The rejection of several reasons why a thing should or should not be done and affirming a single one, considered most valid.

Should I get another tattoo?

1. No. Three are enough.

2. No. My wife will hit me with a garden tool.

3. No. I’m too old for another tattoo.

So, I guess not.

Hmmm. Wait a minute–I’ve changed my mind. I really, really, really want another tattoo, and wanting another one is a good enough reason for me.

Why else would you get a tattoo?

Now, I’ve got to figure out what it’s going to be and where to put it. Major challenge.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Expeditio

Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational patterns of arguments]).

Me: Why did you get a tattoo of a garage door opener on the right cheek of your butt? Wait, wait, don’t tell me! Knowing you, I think there are three possible reasons: 1. Donny Osmond has one.  I know for a fact that Donny has no tattoos on his butt (check out the YouTube video), so that’s out. 2. Your ‘little friends’ ordered you to do it. You’ve been taking your medication, so that’s out. 3. You acted on random impulse.  Since you’ve spent your life doing things without without considering their consequences (e.g. when you amputated your pinky), I’m going with option 3: random impulse, right?

You: I did what to my butt?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text

Apophasis

Apophasis (a-pof’-a-sis): The rejection of several reasons why a thing should or should not be done and affirming a single one, considered most valid.

Should I mow the lawn right now?  1. Do I have the time? Not really. 2. Does the lawn actually need mowing right now? Not really.  3. Did I just take delivery of a new red lawn tractor with four-wheel drive, a 60-inch mower deck, air-conditioned cab, and an i-pod dock?  Yes. So, should I mow the lawn right now? What are you nuts? Of course I should!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Expeditio

Expeditio (ex-pe-di’-ti-o): After enumerating all possibilities by which something could have occurred, the speaker eliminates all but one (=apophasis). Although the Ad Herennium author lists expeditio as a figure, it is more properly considered a method of argument [and pattern of organization] (sometimes known as the “Method of Residues” when employed in refutation[, and “Elimination Order” when employed to organize a speech. The reference to ‘method’ hearkens back to the Ramist connection between organizational patterns of discourses and organizational patterns of arguments]).

Where did you get that beautiful diamond ring? No, don’t tell me–let me guess. Either you bought it, found it, stole it, or somebody gave it to you.  Now, let’s see . . . There’s no way you’d buy something like that for yourself–you’re the cheapest person I know.  If you found it, I know you’d would’ve handed it over to lost and found–at any rate you wouldn’t be showing it off like it’s yours–you’d be telling everybody you found it and you’d be looking for its owner. There’s no way you’d ever steal anything–I’ve known you since we were kids. So, all I can say is: Who gave it to you? What’s up? Wow! Life is good!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Apophasis

Apophasis (a-pof’-a-sis): The rejection of several reasons why a thing should or should not be done and affirming a single one, considered most valid.

When he told her she had to sit at the back of the bus, she could have simply complied; but compliance with injustice perpetuates it. When he told her she had to sit at the back of the bus, she could have stepped off the bus and walked away; but walking away from evil leaves it lashing at those who remain. So, she held her place–she held her seat.  And abiding in a higher law that’s written in all of our hearts, she faced wickedness with resistance–with courage and dignity.  And on that day she showed us what it takes to deliver ourselves from tyranny.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)