Category Archives: tmesis

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.


I’m from New-friggin-Jersey— and Bruce and Frank and Thomas light bulb Edison too. I was the back-flash-lash: if you didn’t respect me, bang on your head. Growing up, the first word I learned was “con.” The first words of wisdom I learned were from the tattoo-covered guy down the street: “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.”

OK—I’m kidding. I did grow up in New Jersey, and it was great, sure, there was a bit of crime here and there, but there was so much more. What about the shore? Seaside Heights—the boardwalk and the beach, the rickety rides like the Wild Mouse and the Tilt-A-Whirl. The Wild Mouse was the scariest ride I ever went on—it made you feel like you were going to derail—it had runners under the tracks to hold it on the tracks, but every once in awhile they’d break and the mouse-car would fly into the Atlantic Ocean. Nobody was ever killed as far as I can remember. When my daughter was around 8 they had a version of the Wild Mouse at the New York State Fair. She begged to go on it. I capitulated after telling her ten or fifteen times the ride was the scariest ever. We took the ride. We got off and my daughter couldn’t talk for ten minutes.

The Tilt-A-Whirl is a big circular thing with a wall, like big jar lid. Everybody gets strapped to the wall. It starts rotating, faster and faster until there’s enough centrifugal force to tilt it to a ninety-degree angle to the ground. my most memorable experience on the Tilt-A-Whirl was getting hit in the face by a shoe that had flown off the person across from me. Luckily, it wasn’t boot.

Anyway, growing up in New Jersey was great. I even went through Army basic training there; at Ft. Dix during the Vietnam War. I had my first legal drink at Ft. Dix—watered down beer. No matter how much I drank, I couldn’t get drunk. I missed the liquor store back home where they never checked ID. Missing a “liberal” liquor store is a Jersey Boy’s version of homesickness. So to help me and my fellow trainees cope, I set up a little import business. I had a “friend” in New Egypt, about 5 miles from the Fort. But hey, that’s another story.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.


No more mask. I got my shot so I’m not worrying too much—just a little. This whole thing has been a constant front page buzz—a pan-damn-demic all around the world—nobody spared the possibility of contracting it. We were bolted into our homes going nuts consuming every inch of news—unless we had to work: that was like jumping out of a foxhole and charging the enemy every day. At least we didn’t have to deal with rat flea fever.

We never imagined that this late in the world’s adventure we’d get a plague from cute little Pangolins and have a President who didn’t give a damn if we all died. Thank God we got rid of him, even if he tried to steal the election and overthrow our Democracy. I bid him good riddance along with THE DISEASE. Birds of a feather.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

We sit idly by while Trump destroys much of what was built in the past 50 years–from civil rights to climate change policies, Trump has co-poppin-opted truth, justice and freedom, replacing them with a steady steam of lies, a disgusting Supreme Court justice and restrictions on the freedom of speech in his own White House.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

Last week I was in North Ko-wonderful-rea meeting with another humble dictator. I’m a better dictator than he is because I don’t starve people or execute them with Anti-aircraft guns. Instead, I tell lie, after lie, after lie. By murdering the truth, it works as well as murdering people. Once the truth is dead, you can bury it or cremate it and forget about it. Then, you replace the dead truths with vibrant living lies designed to scare, outrage and justify bullying the weak!

Look at Texas. Perfect example. Children “taken” from their families. I blame the Democrats over and over again. It’s a lie (it’s actually my policy). I have my cake (jailed children) and eat it too (blame Democrats). Ha ha! Am I evil? Yes, of course! I’m taking America to hell.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

The far right outer space Re-nutty-publicans have a long way to go before their health care bill becomes the law of the land.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

Hilary Clinton on the grill again over Ben-freakin-ghazi. Thanks for another clown show House Republicans.

The Committee’s formula for Select Idiocy:

Seven Bozos + Five Reasonable People + Thirteen Months = -$3,500,000.  Money well-spent; if you like disgusting displays of partisan politics, squandering enough US taxpayer dollars to put a small village through college, and last but not least, vomiting on your TV’s remote control.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

Thanks for making me a target, Target! So far, I’ve “spent” $11,000 on my Master-hack-it-card.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

It is time to do what must be done. Sooner, not later.

Are we Team U.S. of fuggetaboutit-A?

I don’t think so.

I’d like to think that we are Team U.S. of friggin-kaboomin-A!

You know what to do!

It’s a slam jump swish 3-point lay-up free throw hook shot–It’s a full-court no “me” in “team” press! Blow your whistles and grab your b-balls, we’re going to war!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

The music was fan-trance-tastic.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

Today we start Kagan’s Senate confir-nasty-mation hearings–a showcase for partisan politics.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Tmesis

Tmesis (tmee’-sis): Interjecting a word or phrase between parts of a compound word or between syllables of a word.

This is the most ridiculous proposal we’ve ever had put in front of us! It’ll result in another piece of legis-Bozo-lation–a law written by clowns to guide their circus act! I say, no way will I ever vote to approve it, and neither should you!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).