Category Archives: metalepsis

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.


Your dreams are nightmares waiting to hatch. They’ll be featherless and will crash when they jump from your mind-nest out into the world. I can hear them bouncing off anybody who will listen and who will get a good laugh as payment for their wasted time.

I just don’t know what else to say. Dreams are like cheese, and cheese is like truth. There are so many different cheeses, likewise there are many many different dreams. You have cheddar, you have the “can’t open your locker dream.” You have feta, you have the “teeth are falling out dream.” This list is endless. But, then there’s truth—it goes well with cheese: like a delicate cracker with just the right amount of salt, and shortening, and gluten. Mmm! I’ll have some of that! Give me a slab of Port Salut on a warm truth-cracker! In a way, dreams follow the truth around like a child chasing a butterfly. The child will never catch the butterfly and would not know what to do with it anyway, like an electric drill, or a motorcycle, or a federal income tax form. You just yell at the kid: “wake up,” and that usually works. If it fails, make sure they major in philosophy when they go to college. A sort of cordial recalcitrance, or witty smugness will take them far, perhaps as far as a PhD.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.


Your tongue is mightier than the spoon. It’s like there are professional wrestlers doing battling inside your mouth. Who will win? The peas or the carrots? Crazy meal! Your dinner’s but a load of freight packed between your jaws.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.

You are a meat head.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.

Your imagination is an empty stretcher in an ambulance headed to Duncan Donuts.  Your dream is to fill the stretcher with strawberry frosted donuts, and wrestle playfully with Mike Pence and Vladimir Putin on the stretcher as they squat inside your head, clutching donuts and growling and smiling at you, who, as a matter of fact are holding a Nutella filled sugar donut in each hand.

Wow!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.

You see yourself as a bridge over troubled waters–to me you’re a doormat over dog poop.

  • Post your own metalepsis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.

Tomorrow, I’m headed to San Fransisco to get my heart back. Please remind me not to leave it there again!

  • Post your own metalepsis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Metalepsis

Metalepsis (me-ta-lep’-sis): Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration. A metonymical substitution of one word for another which is itself figurative.

You’re such a shoe head–Birkenstock, Gucci, Puma, Nike, Bass, Timberland, Crocs, Nine West, Marc Jacobs, ECCO, Zanotti, Clergerie, Vacini. Yikes! Your closet looks like Zappos’s website!

  • Post your own metalepsis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).