Tag Archives: Gorgias’s Weblog

Cataphasis

Cataphasis (kat-af’-a-sis): A kind of paralipsis in which one explicitly affirms the negative qualities that one then passes over.

“Once again, right here, tonight, live on CNN, I am not going to ask Mitch McConnel how he managed to lose control of the Senate and put our nation’s security at risk. I’m not even going to ask him why he has such disrespect for federal employees and such a dysfunctional relationship with the Speaker of the House. I won’t even ask him how he managed to almost lose his last reelection bid.

I’m pretty sure CNN’s viewers already know the answers to those questions!

Now, you asked whether I am going to run for President of the United State of America? That, my friend, you’ll have to ask my psychiatrist! She’s the one who monitors my meds and ties me down at night.”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Abating

Abating: English term for anesis: adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis (the addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification).

Your new house is beautiful! Too bad it’s right next to the freeway.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anacoloutha

Anacoloutha (an-a-co’-lu-tha): Substituting one word with another whose meaning is very close to the original, but in a non-reciprocal fashion; that is, one could not use the first, original word as a substitute for the second. This is the opposite of acoloutha.

Rising sun rips the night; jagged day, jags of light.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Assonance

Assonance (ass’-o-nance): Repetition of similar vowel sounds, preceded and followed by different consonants, in the stressed syllables of adjacent words.

The new parking restrictions are a cue to everyone who knows how crowded the village green can be on Saturday mornings in summer and fall: a two-block walk from a side street will keep people away. Who wants to lug a couple of turnips, twelve ears of corn, and a torn bag of tomatoes two blocks back to their car? Not me. Can’t you see how this will hurt the local produce farmers?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

Today we celebrate the hope that is honored and fulfilled by our being gathered here. Today is also a compelling reminder of what is not here.

The future.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. Opposite of anesis.

I just got back to the U.S.A.  Home at last!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

When your yacht  leaked, you bailed it out. When your business failed, you bailed out.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Apocope

Apocope (a-pok’-o-pe): Omitting a letter or syllable at the end of a word. A kind of metaplasm.

Are you havin a laugh?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Hypallage

Hypallage (hy-pal’-la-ge): Shifting the application of words. Mixing the order of which words should correspond with which others. Also, sometimes, a synonym for metonymy (see Quintilian).

Birds do not bark. Dogs do not tweet. Cows do not croak. Frogs do not moo. Stop trying to prove yourself by doing what you can’t do.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. Opposite of anesis.

I did not mean to hurt you. Not even the slighest bit.

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Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antirrhesis

Antirrhesis (an-tir-rhee’-sis): Rejecting reprehensively the opinion or authority of someone.

I reject your point of view–it’s based on the belief that people cannot be trusted to govern themselves.  If people cannot be trusted to govern themselves, who is going to govern them? Cows? Caterpillars? Coyotes? Hoot owls? Earthworms? How can we trust a person who claims that people can’t be trusted? Certainly, I don’t trust you–not because you’re a person, but because you’re a fool.

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Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Acervatio

Acervatio (ak-er-va’-ti-o): Latin term Quintilian employs for both asyndeton (acervatio dissoluta: a loose heap) and polysyndeton (acervatio iuncta: a conjoined heap).

Asyndeton: the omission of conjunctions between clauses, often resulting in a hurried rhythm or vehement effect.

We practice, we play, we win, we lose, we love it! That’s it. That’s our game plan. Let’s go!

Polysydeton: employing many conjunctions between clauses, often slowing the tempo or rhythm.

You told me you were my friend, and you let me believe you were going to help me, and you kept me thinking everything was going to be all right, and then you walked out the door, and you didn’t leave a trace, and all my dreams were shattered; and now you’re asking me to forgive you and welcome you back like nothing happened at all? Get out!

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Definitions courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Abbaser

Abbaser: [George] Puttenham’s English term for tapinosis. Also equivalent to meiosis: reference to something with a name disproportionately lesser than its nature (a kind of litotes: deliberate understatement, especially when expressing a thought by denying its opposite).

New York–a little town on a little island in a river.

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Definitions courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Abating

Abating: English term for anesis: adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis (the addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification).

His new job is great, but it keeps him away from his family and friends.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Synzeugma

Synzeugma (sin-zoog’-ma): That kind of zeugma in which a verb joins (and governs) two phrases by coming between them. A synonym for mesozeugma.

Either with luck, hope is realized, or with hard work.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Graecismus

Graecismus (gree-kis’-mus): Using Greek words, examples, or grammatical structures. Sometimes considered an affectation of erudition.

There’s a kairos for everything.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Exouthenismos

Exouthenismos (ex-ou-then-is’-mos): An expression of contempt.

You are a stain.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epilogus

Epilogus (e-pi-lo’-gus): Providing an inference of what is likely to follow.

They will not live happily ever after.  They will be hunted, caught, tried, convicted, and punished. That will be their fate. That is their future. The end.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Distinctio

Distinctio (dis-tinc’-ti-o): Eliminating ambiguity surrounding a word by explicitly specifying each of its distinct meanings.

This “bar” is not a bar of soap, candy, or silver.  This bar isn’t named Joe’s Place.  It isn’t a tool to pry things loose.  It isn’t made of sand. This bar is where we bring our disputes and settle them in accord with principles of justice!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anastrophe

Anastrophe (an-as’-tro-phee): Departure from normal word order for the sake of emphasis. Anastrophe is most often a synonym for hyperbaton, but is occasionally referred to as a more specific instance of hyperbaton: the changing of the position of only a single word.

Perfect, nobody is.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Aschematiston

Aschematiston: The use of plain, unadorned or unornamented language. Or, the unskilled use of figurative language. A vice. [Outside of any particular context of use or sense of its motive, it may be difficult to determine what’s “plain, unadorned or unornamented language.” The same is true of the “unskilled use of figurative language.”]

1. I am.

2. It’s time to put the brakes on that tomato–it’s permeating my mind like a frozen pants suit.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Ratiocinatio

Ratiocinatio (ra’-ti-o-cin-a’-ti-o): Reasoning (typically with oneself) by asking questions. Sometimes equivalent to anthypophora. More specifically, ratiocinatio can mean making statements, then asking the reason (ratio) for such an affirmation, then answering oneself. In this latter sense ratiocinatio is closely related to aetiologia. [As a questioning strategy, it is also related to erotima {the general term for a rhetorical question}.]

We must buy a more fuel efficient car–maybe a hybrid. Why? Gasoline prices are are rising every week. I’m paying nearly $500 per month just to drive to and from work. Even if fuel prices go down, we’ll still be ahead of the game. No matter what, saving fuel is a good thing.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Dicaeologia

Dicaeologia (di-kay-o-lo’-gi-a): Admitting what’s charged against one, but excusing it by necessity.

A: I got your message. One more promise broken. One more weekend blown off!

B: I’m sorry. Yes, it’s true–one more promise broken.  I should’ve told you in my message why I can’t come up. I have poison ivy all over my legs. They’re coated with lotion and they’re so swollen that I can’t drive. In fact, I can hardly walk. I really don’t have a choice about coming up. How about next weekend? I hope the poison ivy will be gone by then.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Diaporesis

Diaporesis: Deliberating with oneself as though in doubt over some matter; asking oneself (or rhetorically asking one’s hearers) what is the best or appropriate way to approach something [=aporia].

Many people are asking: “What does Helen want?” Well, Helen wants to know: should she stay or should she go? Come on! I really want to know! Should she stay or should she go?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Articulus

Articulus (ar-tic’-u-lus): Roughly equivalent to “phrase” in English, except that the emphasis is on joining several phrases (or words) successively without any conjunctions (in which case articulus is simply synonymous with the Greek term asyndeton). See also brachylogia.

Articulus is also best understood in terms of differing speeds of style that depend upon the length of the elements of a sentence. The Ad Herennium author contrasts the the slower speed of concatenated membra (see membrum) to the quicker speed possible via articulus.

My yard is big, gigantic, huge! I need some sheep to keep it clipped.

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Definition and commentary courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).