Tag Archives: anesis

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.


I work in the Cosmic Mirror Factory in Rabbit Drop, Pennsylvania. I think it reflects well on me, except for the horror I’ve experienced in front of the glass. You see, I’m a fog blower—I get one inch away from a newly made mirror and breathe on it, making a small circle of fog indicating the mirror’s viability. If it fogs, I draw a little smiley face in the fog. If it fails to fog, I smash it with a hammer and send the remnants back for recycling. I had to give up smoking to keep the job. My hacking cough kept me from blowing a stream of breath sufficient to fog the mirror. I was 6 months smoke free when it happened.

I was fog blowing a very large mirror that had been made for the lobby of a hotel in Doha. I couldn’t get it to fog and worried about smashing it, given what it had cost to make. I blew one more breath, hoping for it to fog, and it did! But the whole mirror fogged and the fog opened into portal. I stuck my hand into the portal and something grabbed me and pulled me in. When I got to the other side I looked in every direction, and it was a mirror everywhere I looked. But my reflection was not in any of the mirrors. I was invisible. “This is such a cliche,” I said aloud, voice trembling, “What am I, Alice in Wonderland?” The mirrored world briefly turned to clear glass and then it disappeared altogether leaving me in a log cabin on a ridge overlooking a beautiful valley with a wide river flowing through it. I was thirsty, so I hiked down to the river. I cupped my hands and dipped them in the river. Suddenly I was pulled into the river. I became a leaf. I was floating downriver. There was a centipede riding on me. He said his name was Sean and that he worked in a mirror factory in Edinburgh, Scotland and had been pulled through a mirror there 2 weeks ago, incarnating as a centipede when he got here. I was shocked. It was bad enough being some random leaf, but having a talking centipede riding me downriver was more than I could handle. At my first opportunity I would drown myself. Just then, we went over a waterfall at least fifty feet high. Sean fell off the leaf and the wind caught me and blew me ashore.

I awoke, soaking wet on the factory floor. I was holding a small wet maple leaf between my fingers. There was a wet guy standing over me wearing only a tattered kilt. “I’m Sean,” he said, “you saved my life. I hung onto you and let go when we drifted over the riverbank. Now, I’m going to rest under a rock for a few hours, and then, figure out how to get back to Scotland.” I sat there waiting for the next horror saga to hit. But it didn’t—it never did. I had the little maple leaf mounted in a glass shadow box and I keep it in plain view on my mantle. Given the hell I went trough and it’s role in saving me, it should’ve taught me a lesson, but I don’t know what the lesson is supposed to be. I still work for the Cosmic Mirror Factory as a fog blower, but I have vowed never to touch another mirror ever again. Sean has become an entomologist, specializing in the mating habits of centipedes.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

Your dog is beautiful, but don’t you get tired of picking up his shit and bagging it every time you go for a walk?

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

You have an amazing collection of handbags. Nearly every brand–none of them hardly used at all. So many colors, textures and materials–from formal to informal and everything in between! It must’ve taken you a decade to pull it together.

But

It’s a shame that you don’t have anything made in USA. I don’t care what the rationale may be: it’s a huge gap that diminishes the value of your entire collection.

You better get out there and find some representative handbags that are made in the USA. It shouldn’t be much of a challenge–that’s part of the reason why their absence yells “incomplete collection.”

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

Fourth of July Oration: 2015

July 4th 1776. Congress actually did something!

It adopted a “Declaration of Independence” that had been declared two days before! It only took two days to move it to and through Congress.

It’s opening hook-line seems worthy of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount:

“We hold these truths to be self evident . . .”

Sadly, right from the beginning the so-called “declaration” of independence is a ruse.

“Self-evident” was the 18th-Century’s equivalent of the 21st-Century’s “Obvious.” Ha. Ha.

What was “obvious” to people in the 18th century? To be honest the author(s) should’ve written:

“We hold these truths to be obvious: 1. God created people unequal; 2. with birthrights; 3. among these are property, subjugating serfs, and the pursuit libertine activities worthy of high-born gentlemen, to wit, bedding harlots, whipping servants, smoking opium, fathering bastard children and so forth.”

But ‘we’ [?] ‘all’ [?] ‘know’ [?] ‘better’ [?] in the post-obvious 21st century of fly-eyed semiosis, “infinite jest,” and the resurgence of polio, measles, and chicken pox: One person’s something is somebody else’s something else.

So, as we celebrate the Fourth of July today, remember, in July, 1776 our summer feasting would’ve included yummy Jellies! Jellies were the 18th century equivalent of ‘our’ Jello!

Made from boiled calves feet, scraped horns from the hart deer or the air bladders of sturgeon they were sucked up with smacking stained lips! Maybe George Washington would say today: “Oh Martha, add some of those dainty little marshmallows. I am quite confident they will add a sugary finish to these already lovely little calves feet jellies.”

And there was powerful drink too! Our forebears quaffed Rattle-Skull, Stonewall, Bogus, Blackstrap, Bombo, Mimbo, Whistle Belly, Syllabub, and Flip. And they got (according to Ben Franklin) addled, afflicted, biggy, boozy, busky, buzzey, cherubimical, cracked, or “halfway to Concord.”

Well, in solidarity with our forebears I propose that we down a few bits of jellied lamb salad, turkey in aspic, and Californian Prune jello ring. And let’s hoist a Santa’s Butt, Bishop’s Finger, Dogs Bollocks, Polygamy Porter, and 4 or 5 of our BELOVED PBRs. And we, as our forebears did, will get buttered, shit-faced, hammered, spanked, sideways, and, by God, we will GET ALL THE WAY to Concord!!

Have a great Fourth of July.

Try not to blow off a finger, blind you little brother with a bottle rocket, or set your neighbor’s house on fire with rogue pyrotechnics.

  • Post your own anesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. [The opposite of anesis.]

In every religious text, “doing good” is lauded and “doing evil” is vituperated. Suspended between good and evil, heaven and hell,  religious people are bound to decide which is which, why to do, and how to act in accord with a higher being’s will, aiming always all the time to everywhere “do good.”

The resulting catalog of actions motivated by “doing good” range from washing other peoples’ feet to cutting off other peoples’ heads.

All in a day history is made.  From toe to head, washing and cutting; bubbling suds, bubbling blood.

Healing and murdering.

Doing good.

  • Post your own epitasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Abating

Abating: English term for anesis: adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis (the addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification).

Your new BMW is fantastic! German engineering! Top speed 150 MPH! Was blue the only color available?

  • Do your own abating on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

My little doggy is cute, affectionate, and obedient.  That said, he smells like a polluted mud flat at low tide on a hot afternoon.

  • Post your own anesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. [The opposite of anesis.]

I can’t believe how long it’s been since we’ve had some time to ourselves. Alone at last!

  • Post your own epitasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. Opposite of anesis.

I think you’re obnoxious. You’re totally inappropriate.

  • Post your own epitasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Abating

Abating: English term for anesis: adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis (the addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification).

Your new house is beautiful! Too bad it’s right next to the freeway.

  • Post your own abating on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. Opposite of anesis.

I just got back to the U.S.A.  Home at last!

  • Post your own epitasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. Opposite of anesis.

I did not mean to hurt you. Not even the slighest bit.

  • Post your own epitasis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Abating

Abating: English term for anesis: adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis (the addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification).

His new job is great, but it keeps him away from his family and friends.

  • Do your own abating on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

He was smart, funny, and generally open to new ideas.  However, his temper was off the charts.

  • Post your own anesis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)