Category Archives: merismus

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

Not every whole has parts, but can you call something a whole if it does not have parts? What about Moses parting the Red Sea? Or, me parting my hair? Then there’s the bomb that blows things apart. Dividing a whole into its parts implies that it has parts in the first place, and the division is of concepts or entities that are correctly construed as the bound-together ensemble ‘making up’ a given whole.

In discourse, there are many good reasons for dividing wholes into parts. And also, from a different perspective, assembling parts into wholes, like an IKEA adventure, or a Christmas dollhouse, or stringing beads onto a necklace. But that’s not what we’re talking about. We’re talking about wholes. Their division makes things easier to remember, for speaker and listener. It gives a discourse the sense that it’s going somewhere as each part lapses and fades into the next. In addition, the part/whole division gives the discourse a suspenseful aura by building in the anticipation of what’s next by proffering previewed parts. Let me demonstrate:

This is an orange. It is spherical, and guess what? It is orange. Ha ha. It has four parts: the skin, the fruit, the seeds, the stem. I’ll be covering each part in the order I just listed them. So first, the orange’s skin. . .

If you think about it, you can divide just about anything into parts, even if it makes you bitter, angry, and depressed. Take my first marriage, for example. It had three parts: 1. We got married, 2. She cheated, 3. We got divorced. See, I don’t even need to go into detail to give you a clear picture of what happened. Now, let’s look at my most recent business catastrophe: 1. I took out a government-backed small business loan, 2. Nobody wanted popcorn coconut smoothies, 3. I went bankrupt, 4. I am in debt up to my ass until 2030.

Well, there you have it. You know the old saying: If you have the parts you have the whole. This in itself can be a further employment of the part/whole strategy: you can deter people by showing them they don’t have the parts: If your shoe does not have laces, you can’t go for a comfortable walk. So, forget it. Oh, I can sell you some shoelaces. How badly do you want to go for a comfortable walk? A lot? Not much? Not at all?


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.


Rep. Greene’s trustworthiness can be divided into three parts: (1) Liar; (2) Prevaricator; and (3) Mythomaniac. Yep, she’s three times as full of crap as a mentally stable person.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The Republican Party is divided into liars, misogynists, bootlicks, and “Christians.”  These four parts, taken together, are tokens of disrepair. So long as they remain in power, the Republicans pose a danger to our republic: to the foundations of its moral outlook, and the regime of truth providing it guidance.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

 

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The Trump Administration is divided into four uneven parts: family, friends, business associates, and lies. “Lies” almost accounts for all of the Administration’s total size.

Trump’s latest lie: “I don’t wear underpants.” Definite lie–you can see the elastic waistband sticking out of his pants. One can only speculate as to why he would lie about wearing underpants. We think it may be because Putin does not wear underpants–this is a verified fact. Given the esteem that Trump holds Putin in, we can easily see why he would lie about his own underpants.  The question is, though, “Why lie about your underpants when you can just pull them off and ‘go commando’ (like Putin) for real?” We’ll have to ask this question at the next press briefing. We’re sure Kommander Huckabee will answer right up! That is, there’s got to be a good policy driven answer to the underpants question & we’ll find it! It will be a snap (ha ha)

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

 

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

Donald Trump is one part showman, one part showman, and one part showman.

He’s all showman!

Right now, I’m enjoying the DT show: it’s a fun-filled comedy with wonderful supporting actors who add to the glee.

But, if he gets elected, I’m afraid it may become a farce, or a Greek tragedy.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

On a typical clock time is divided into hours, minutes, and seconds. Time consciousness is another thing altogether.

But more importantly, being unconscious of time (the past, the present, and the future; the hours, minutes, and seconds; the years, the months, the weeks and the days; the birthdays, the anniversaries, and the recurring rituals bound by cultured increments meting out patterns that punctuate, articulate, and constitute social seasons and their knocks of opportunity) one may encounter the goddess Ananke seated in the beat of one’s heart.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The most advantageous plan has six key ingredients: money, more money, lots more money, money, money, money. Get it? It’s going to take money–a whole lot of money to do it right.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

This plan has two key parts: its costs and its benefits. First, let’s take a look at its costs.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

Morning, noon, and night–three times to eat, three times to sleep, three times to work, three times to play–three times for everything. Time and what I do with it–two different things.  One is set by WWV.  The other is set by me.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The USA is made up of states, counties, parishes, townships, towns, cities, neighborhoods & more–so much more!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

My truck has a rusted body, bald tires, a clattering engine, squeaky brakes, a broken radio, worn out seats, a cracked windshield, and a smoky tailpipe. Should I call the junkyard?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)