Tag Archives: merismus

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The Trump Administration is divided into four uneven parts: family, friends, business associates, and lies. “Lies” almost accounts for all of the Administration’s total size.

Trump’s latest lie: “I don’t wear underpants.” Definite lie–you can see the elastic waistband sticking out of his pants. One can only speculate as to why he would lie about wearing underpants. We think it may be because Putin does not wear underpants–this is a verified fact. Given the esteem that Trump holds Putin in, we can easily see why he would lie about his own underpants.  The question is, though, “Why lie about your underpants when you can just pull them off and ‘go commando’ (like Putin) for real?” We’ll have to ask this question at the next press briefing. We’re sure Kommander Huckabee will answer right up! That is, there’s got to be a good policy driven answer to the underpants question & we’ll find it! It will be a snap (ha ha)

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

On a typical clock time is divided into hours, minutes, and seconds. Time consciousness is another thing altogether.

But more importantly, being unconscious of time (the past, the present, and the future; the hours, minutes, and seconds; the years, the months, the weeks and the days; the birthdays, the anniversaries, and the recurring rituals bound by cultured increments meting out patterns that punctuate, articulate, and constitute social seasons and their knocks of opportunity) one may encounter the goddess Ananke seated in the beat of one’s heart.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The most advantageous plan has six key ingredients: money, more money, lots more money, money, money, money. Get it? It’s going to take money–a whole lot of money to do it right.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

This plan has two key parts: its costs and its benefits. First, let’s take a look at its costs.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

Morning, noon, and night–three times to eat, three times to sleep, three times to work, three times to play–three times for everything. Time and what I do with it–two different things.  One is set by WWV.  The other is set by me.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Distributio

Distributio (dis-tri-bu’-ti-o): (1) Assigning roles among or specifying the duties of a list of people, sometimes accompanied by a conclusion.  (2) Sometimes this term is simply a synonym for diaeresis or merismus, which are more general figures involving division.

The President is the Decider, the Vice President likes to decide what the Decider decides, hoping that the Supreme Court will decide to side with the Decider, while Congress often takes so many sides it can’t decide, and everybody else is undecided, except the Pundits, who get their information from insiders (who’re all on somebody’s side) and pollsters (who’re on the outside).

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

The USA is made up of states, counties, parishes, townships, towns, cities, neighborhoods & more–so much more!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Merismus

Merismus (mer-is’-mus): The dividing of a whole into its parts.

My truck has a rusted body, bald tires, a clattering engine, squeaky brakes, a broken radio, worn out seats, a cracked windshield, and a smoky tailpipe. Should I call the junkyard?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)