Tag Archives: aetiologia

Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’-i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

Let’s go out to dinner. I’m not hungry right now, but I want to ‘hit the town’ tonight. Also, you haven’t had a night off from cooking in a couple of weeks. We can go some place that’s good and cheap too. I know just the place–they’re sold trillions of hamburgers and they’re right down the street. After dinner we can take a walk around the block. It’ll be just like a date! I can feel the romance building already!

Put on your shoes. We’re going out!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’-i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

I want to go to the movies today because it’s raining, there’s nothing else to do, and I have a coupon for two tickets! Besides, your mother’s driving me crazy. Let’s get out of here while she’s taking a shower. Come on, let’s go!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Ratiocinatio

Ratiocinatio (ra’-ti-o-cin-a’-ti-o): Reasoning (typically with oneself) by asking questions. Sometimes equivalent to anthypophora. More specifically, ratiocinatio can mean making statements, then asking the reason (ratio) for such an affirmation, then answering oneself. In this latter sense ratiocinatio is closely related to aetiologia. [As a questioning strategy, it is also related to erotima {the general term for a rhetorical question}.]

“To be, or not to be?”

Ironically (sardonically, cynically, pitifully, wistfully, blissfully, bashfully, shit in my pants fully) I (and we) already know the answer: we are all going to not be. We are all going to die.

So, if we are all going to “not be” and we know it, and we really want to show it, should we all just clap our hands, take out a life insurance policy, rest easy, and wait not to be?

Is it better to suffer the slings and crutches and bedpans of our withering biceps and sagging boobies, or turn on the gas?

I don’t know.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’-i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

My daughter’s life is an open book, because it’s my checkbook.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

 

Ratiocinatio

Ratiocinatio (ra’-ti-o-cin-a’-ti-o): Reasoning (typically with oneself) by asking questions. Sometimes equivalent to anthypophora. More specifically, ratiocinatio can mean making statements, then asking the reason (ratio) for such an affirmation, then answering oneself. In this latter sense ratiocinatio is closely related to aetiologia. [As a questioning strategy, it is also related to erotima {the general term for a rhetorical question}.]

In Florida, I have a right to stand my ground. You threaten me, I kill you. Under lex talionis, does that tally up? What would Hammurabi say?

Let’s re-taliate the ‘taliation: What’s the fair price to pay for being perceived as a deadly threat?

I won’t back down vs. I can’t back down. Back to the wall? Fire away! Otherwise, run away. Does that tally up?

I give up.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’-i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

I do not support that candidate, for he misspeaks too much!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

I will not buy an i-Pad because it does not have a camera for video chat. I’m betting the next iteration will have a camera for video chat. Then, I’m in!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Ratiocinatio

Ratiocinatio (ra’-ti-o-cin-a’-ti-o): Reasoning (typically with oneself) by asking questions. Sometimes equivalent to anthypophora. More specifically, ratiocinatio can mean making statements, then asking the reason (ratio) for such an affirmation, then answering oneself. In this latter sense ratiocinatio is closely related to aetiologia. [As a questioning strategy, it is also related to erotima {the general term for a rhetorical question}.]

We must buy a more fuel efficient car–maybe a hybrid. Why? Gasoline prices are are rising every week. I’m paying nearly $500 per month just to drive to and from work. Even if fuel prices go down, we’ll still be ahead of the game. No matter what, saving fuel is a good thing.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Aetiologia

Aetiologia (ae-ti-o-log’-i-a): A figure of reasoning by which one attributes a cause for a statement or claim made, often as a simple relative clause of explanation.

The times we’re living through are puzzling, rough, and uncertain. I say this today because, once again, I awoke to the drumbeat of another disaster pulsing through the news–on the radio, on the Internet, in the newspaper, in high definition on TV.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)