Tag Archives: conduplicatio

Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.


I decided to get away—to get away from it all. “It all” was my job. I worked in a breakfast cereal mill operating the flake-pounder, pounding away, flattening flakes and moving them down the line on a dirty old conveyer belt that’s been moving cereal flakes since cereal flakes were invented somewhere in Michigan hundreds of years ago. I’d been running the same flake-pounder since I graduated from high school—that was 16 years ago. Even though I could have all the breakfast cereal I wanted, that just wasn’t good enough any more. Last year, I started eating scrambled eggs and toast for breakfast—breakfast that should’ve been cereal, but I didn’t care any more. I was breaking away. So, here I am holding a yard sale, a week before my official resignation. My boss shows up and sees the cereal bowl I was awarded for “ten years of loyal service.” It’s up for sale for twenty-five cents. He looks at me like I should be dead, and buys the bowl. He throws it on the sidewalk and it shatters into fragments, one of which hits my neighbor Barbara in the forehead. She screams in pain and my boss starts running to his car, which isn’t easy—he’s 5’ 6” and weighs around 300 lbs. Suddenly, he made a grunting sound and fell writhing to the ground. He dropped his car keys. I saw my chance. I motioned to Barbara, I grabbed the keys off the ground, and we got in Boss’s Maserati and took off. We stopped at a convenience store for supplies. When I opened the trunk to put the groceries away, we saw a large suitcase. I opened it. It was filled with hundred-dollar bills. There was also a photo of the boss standing behind a table piled high with cocaine. That’s when we decided our future was set. We had evidence that would put the boss away forever. We knew he couldn’t report what had happened on my lawn—he would be nailed. Barbara and I hugged, got back in the boss’s Maserati, and took off for the tropics, AKA Key West, where we were married, lived, and had three lovely children.

Barbara passed away three years ago. Our children are grown, and successful with families of their own. You are reading this now because I have passed and left a provision in my will that this story be made public so people can see that sometimes crime pays. With me and Barbara it all happened on the spur of the moment. If we had planned it, we would probably have been caught. Thanks Boss!


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.

More! More! More! More what? Soup? Money? Lawn tractors? Friends? Weasels? Bar codes? Guns? Shoes? Bandwidth? Cake? Rainbows? Rice cookers? Wine? Smart Wool socks? Rings? Car seats? Salt? Scissors? Time? Proof? Polartec pants? Printer paper? Windows? Gluten? Gaslights? Cash? Ripe avacados? Room? Tea? Tables? Turnstiles? Tonsils? Fur coats? Space heaters? Sweaters? Crayons? Or what?

More! More! More! Never stop. No surfeit! No bulge! No harps playing as they put you on eternal layaway.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

The Daily Trope is available on Amazon in paperback under the title of The Book of Tropes for $9.95. It is also available in Kindle format for $5.99.

 

Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.

Trump so far: The first 100 days. The first 100 fiascos. The first 100 tweets. The first 100 regrets. The first 100 people stuck in airports.

The first 100 times I ever had misgivings about American democracy’s ability to elect capable Presidents (no matter what their party affiliation or political agendas) who abide by the Constitution and treat “We the people” with respect.

I’m tired of hearing about fake news, cry babies, and all the other  insults.

The next 100 days: Grow up and start acting like the President of the United States of America, instead of a low-budget gossip columnist sending slop off a Twitter feed whenever the impulse moves you.

  • Post your own conduplicatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.

The stars are brightly shining tonight. The stars are pinholes in the shroud of night. Sunrise pulls the shroud away. Sunset pulls it back again. And we, we humans, connect the stars together, tracing imaginative and invisible arcs bridging the gaps of darkness, star by star. Doing so, we romance the night sky’s randomness into guides and graphs and sky-borne bookmarks of gods, goddesses, and signs of the future foretold by birth.

So stars in sooth may stay the vexations of carnality, consciousness, and time, offering comfort to knowing that what is temporary is what we are.

  • Post your own conduplicatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.

If one knows the truth, one does not have to like the truth. What’s the difference between liking the truth and knowing the truth?  Maybe it’s the difference between freedom and necessity–to be sure one may love a lie (and lying too) & that’s the truth!

  • Post your own conduplicatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Conduplicatio

Conduplicatio (con-du-pli-ca’-ti-o): The repetition of a word or words. A general term for repetition sometimes carrying the more specific meaning of repetition of words in adjacent phrases or clauses. Sometimes used to name either ploce or epizeuxis.

Sometimes it’s worth it to take a risk. Often a risk is not worth taking. Do you really want to take this risk?

  • Post your own conduplicatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)