Monthly Archives: August 2015

Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

Is it good to behead the infidels?  To burn them alive? To shoot them in their terror-filled faces? To blow them to pieces of meat to land justly on Satan’s unholy table–to be eternally chewed, swallowed, vomited–each infidel feeling it all in every torn fragment of their flesh and every drop of their splattered blood?

Of course it is good!

Of course!  Of course!  Of course!

You clamor and shout your agreement! You signify your righteousness! You are truly men of faith!

Yes! We are blessed! We are virtuous! Our holy cause is just!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed test added by Gorgias.

 

Anacoloutha

Anacoloutha (an-a-co’-lu-tha): Substituting one word with another whose meaning is very close to the original, but in a non-reciprocal fashion; that is, one could not use the first, original word as a substitute for the second. This is the opposite of acoloutha.

Let’s go shopping. Let’s go die.

Public spaces blown to pieces. People spaces smoking ruins. Stalls and store fronts made into war fronts.

Blanket-covered victims.

Pull away a victim’s cover, just another person. A son. A father. A daughter. A mother.

All dead, ripped, punctured, riddled.

All guilty of going shopping.

All guilty of being people.

All guilty of being in Bangkok.

Easy grist for the terror mill.

Ripe for senseless execution.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

 

Anacoluthon

Anacoluthon (an-a-co-lu’-thon): A grammatical interruption or lack of implied sequence within a sentence. That is, beginning a sentence in a way that implies a certain logical resolution, but concluding it differently than the grammar leads one to expect. Anacoluthon can be either a grammatical fault or a stylistic virtue, depending on its use. In either case, it is an interruption or a verbal lack of symmetry. Anacoluthon is characteristic of spoken language or interior thought, and thus suggests those domains when it occurs in writing.

Top secret documents . . . does she have anything to say?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

Beauty attracts the soul, the soul opens the mind, the mind imagines a world of passion, peace and happiness.

Happiness is the worship of beauty.

Happiness is a prayer to Eros uttered by mind-voicing to a joyous soul, transfixed by the idea, transfigured by the word, and multiplied by their coupling as form and matter: thought and sound.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Anamnesis

Anamnesis (an’-am-nee’-sis): Calling to memory past matters. More specifically, citing a past author [apparently] from memory.  Anamnesis helps to establish ethos [credibility], since it conveys the idea that the speaker is knowledgeable of the received wisdom from the past.

George Sand tells us, “There is only one happiness in this life, to love and be loved.” Sand almost had it right! But she missed one important point.  As Johnny Depp so thoughtfully put it: “Tomorrow it’ll all be over, then I’ll have to go back to selling pens again.”

Between Sand and Depp there is an emotional chasm.  Between Depp and Sand there is a ticking time bomb.

Tomorrow is always inevitably coming and it can blow to bits the promises, the affections, the passions, and yes, even the “one happiness” afforded by “loving and being loved.”

And when that “one happiness” is exploded by time, burned to ashes by circumstance, and blown away by fortune’s wind, what is left?

Going back to selling pens, or writhing in pain on the cold dirt of despair?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Gorgias has inserted the bracketed words [apparently] and [credibility].

Quotations from:

Sand: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/g/georgesand383232.html

Depp: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnnydepp384558.html

 

Anaphora

Anaphora (an-aph’-o-ra): Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines.

Where is Bernie Sanders?

Where is the Vermont cheddar cheese-eating pinko-wierdo today?

Somewhere?

Where is Donald Trump?

Where is CEO BB Brain bloviating today??

Everywhere!

Bernie, something’s wrong. It should be the other way around.

Bernie! Come on! Say something crazy! Like, “Donald Trump is so angry he’s bleeding out of his eyes and somewhere else!”

That’ll get you noticed!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Anapodoton

Anapodoton (an’-a-po’-do-ton): A figure in which a main clause is suggested by the introduction of a subordinate clause, but that main clause never occurs.

Anapodoton is a kind of anacoluthon, since grammatical expectations are interrupted. If the expression trails off, leaving the subordinate clause incomplete, this is sometimes more specifically called anantapodotonAnapodoton has also named what occurs when a main clause is omitted because the speaker interrupts himself/herself to revise the thought, leaving the initial clause grammatically unresolved but making use of it nonetheless by recasting its content into a new, grammatically complete sentence.

Before Donald Trump’s hair blinded his wife

Or:

A debate is not . . .  A debate should not be a gaggle of Republican geese honking for attention. There should actually be a set set topic or question for the so-called debate, like: “This House would give Bobby Jindal a buzz cut.” Or, “This House believes George Pataki is too tall to be President.” Or, “This House believes Jeb Bush is a mama’s boy.”

The possibilities are endless, and they should all be ad hominem! Insults are much more exciting and substantive than anything else the frontrunners would have to say toward questions like:  “Governor Christie, if elected what would be your first meal in the White House.” Or, “Senator Paul, have you ever considered naming one of your children Paul?” Or, “CEO Trump, how do you spell foreign?”

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anastrophe

Anastrophe (an-as’-tro-phee): Departure from normal word order for the sake of emphasis. Anastrophe is most often a synonym for hyperbaton, but is occasionally referred to as a more specific instance of hyperbaton: the changing of the position of only a single word.

“I today am announcing my candidacy for President of the United State of America!” Elvis Lincoln, Random Republican Party Candidate #46

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).