Tag Archives: anacoenosis

Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

How certain are we of the future? Not at all? Yet, we vest our most human sensibilities in the future: from hope to fear, from gratitude to revenge, from faith to fraud. We are damned to think about, and talk about and act in preparation for an as-of-now nonexistent future.

Do we want justice? Do we share an abiding regard for, and love of, the law? Yes. The law guides our collective walk toward the future. But we know the law is made up of myriad laws. And we know that some laws, because crafted by people–imperfect beings–are fraught with flaws. The flaws come to light in the glare of change, often when fears become hopes and nightmares become dreams.

The mutability of the grounds of human existence require the law’s revision, but revision undertaken from the view of the mountaintop of abstraction with legislators seated upon seats of justice seeking what they hope is good for the “the people” and their Republic.

We are servants. We bind our souls to the Constitution as a dunamis awaiting our deliberations. May we seek truth and find justice.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

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Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

How far should we go as we condemn our enemies? Should we threaten to kill them? Should we see justice done?

We all agree that our enemies are dangerous and pose a threat to our way of life, and the lives of many innocent victims: men and women who just want to live their lives in peace.

Time is of the essence. We should make our choice before it is too late.

We must bomb them in their strongholds–especially in the rugged hills where they gather in caves and tunnels and plan their next attack or construct their IEDs.

Who would object? None of us would object. The die is cast. We will bomb their strongholds tomorrow at 04.00. We will eliminate the threat they pose. We will help our allies live better lives.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed test added by Gorgias.

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

Is it good to behead the infidels?  To burn them alive? To shoot them in their terror-filled faces? To blow them to pieces of meat to land justly on Satan’s unholy table–to be eternally chewed, swallowed, vomited–each infidel feeling it all in every torn fragment of their flesh and every drop of their splattered blood?

Of course it is good!

Of course!  Of course!  Of course!

You clamor and shout your agreement! You signify your righteousness! You are truly men of faith!

Yes! We are blessed! We are virtuous! Our holy cause is just!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed test added by Gorgias.

 

Anthypophora

Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

We need a new car. Mercedes?  Lexus? BMW? Saab?

I like the Mercedes AMG E 63-S wagon.

Let’s look and see if we can find one on the web!

  • Post your own anthypophora on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Buy a print version of The Daily Trope! The print version is titled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99 (or less).

Anthypophora

Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

We’re hungry. Where should we eat? Rosie’s? Pricewhakers? Barnacle Bob’s? Barnacle Bob’s! That’s it! Barnacle Bob’s! We haven’t had fish in months! It’s right down the street. It’s cheap. What are we waiting for? Let’s go!

  • Post your own anthypophora on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Anthypophora

Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

Why am I here? Because I care. Why are you here? Because you care. I care. You care. We care! What are we waiting for? Let’s get this thing cleaned up!

  • Post your own anthypophora on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anacoenosis

Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter.

You tell me–who wouldn’t have made those remarks after being verbally assaulted–after being slandered–by a so-called “friend” of the American people? Yes, you’re right–somebody with no self respect–that’s who! Well, let me tell you–that person isn’t me and never will be me. Enough said. Case closed. Now, let’s get back on track, and let’s remember to respect each other no matter how deeply we may disagree. But let’s also remember that we owe it to ourselves and to the people we serve to vigorously challenge outright lies and false accusations and call to account those individuals who tell and make them.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)