Anacoenosis


Anacoenosis (an’-a-ko-en-os’-is): Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience, usually implying their common interest with the speaker in the matter [and illustrating their communally-held ideals of truth, justice, goodness and beauty, for better and for worse].

How certain are we of the future? Not at all? Yet, we vest our most human sensibilities in the future: from hope to fear, from gratitude to revenge, from faith to fraud. We are damned to think about, and talk about and act in preparation for an as-of-now nonexistent future.

Do we want justice? Do we share an abiding regard for, and love of, the law? Yes. The law guides our collective walk toward the future. But we know the law is made up of myriad laws. And we know that some laws, because crafted by people–imperfect beings–are fraught with flaws. The flaws come to light in the glare of change, often when fears become hopes and nightmares become dreams.

The mutability of the grounds of human existence require the law’s revision, but revision undertaken from the view of the mountaintop of abstraction with legislators seated upon seats of justice seeking what they hope is good for the “the people” and their Republic.

We are servants. We bind our souls to the Constitution as a dunamis awaiting our deliberations. May we seek truth and find justice.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s