Monthly Archives: March 2018

Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis (an’-a-di-plo’-sis): The repetition of the last word (or phrase) from the previous line, clause, or sentence at the beginning of the next. Often combined with climax.

Winter is turning its face away. Away it goes into spring’s warmth. Warmth that’s welcomed by every inch of land and all its creatures. Creatures large and small–animals; two legs and four legs, and crawling and flying insects, and plants rooted in the warming soil, and reptiles basking–basking in the sun on warm rocks and stones; something fulfilled: fulfilled by the inevitability of the seasons and this, the latest coming of spring.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Anamnesis

Anamnesis (an’-am-nee’-sis): Calling to memory past matters. More specifically, citing a past author [apparently] from memory.  Anamnesis helps to establish ethos [credibility], since it conveys the idea that the speaker is knowledgeable of the received wisdom from the past.

PT Barnum tells us “A sucker in born every minute.” I think Donald Trump believes this. But, I think he believes everybody is a sucker. He has good reason to believe it’s true. After all, there were enough suckers to get him elected, and now it seems that everything he has done as President is based on his “everybody’s a sucker principle.”

The latest example: his new nominee for Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Ronny Jackson. He wouldn’t have nominated him if he didn’t believe that Congress is a pack of suckers–who are sucker enough to confirm somebody who’s key “qualifications” may be that he’s a Navy Admiral and Trump’s White House Physician. Where’s the administrative experience for managing an organization with thousands of employees and a 200 billion dollar budget?

I believe his nominee’s key qualification is his absolute allegiance to Trump. Remember when he claimed that 239-pound Trump was not obese?

Let the hearings begin!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Gorgias has inserted the bracketed words [apparently] and [credibility].

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Anaphora

Anaphora (an-aph’-o-ra): Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines.

I found out today that President Trump signed an executive order allowing the dumping of coal mining waste into waterways.

This is another day that makes me angry.

This is another day that makes me mad.

This is another day that makes me scared.

This is another day–another day of coping with our President’s disregard for the consequences of his actions.

What’s next? Dismantle the Civil Rights Act? Declare war on Canada? Legalize fully automatic machine guns?

God only knows!

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Anapodoton

Anapodoton (an’-a-po’-do-ton): A figure in which a main clause is suggested by the introduction of a subordinate clause, but that main clause never occurs.

Anapodoton is a kind of anacoluthon, since grammatical expectations are interrupted. If the expression trails off, leaving the subordinate clause incomplete, this is sometimes more specifically called anantapodotonAnapodoton has also named what occurs when a main clause is omitted because the speaker interrupts himself/herself to revise the thought, leaving the initial clause grammatically unresolved but making use of it nonetheless by recasting its content into a new, grammatically complete sentence.

The other day when I was at a meeting . . .  Don’t listen to what they say!  I stand tall everywhere I go. Nobody can push me around unless they want to end up face down on the hardwood floor. When I’m at a meeting . . . You know me better than anyone else. I am tuned in, focused and on track. I am sick of the rumors about my behavior. Ok, so I threw my cellphone at Gifford! But God, what an idiot–he just keeps asking the same question over and over again–he’s like my kid asking every ten minutes “Are we there yet.”

To hell with all of them–whiners, dolts and yodel heads one and all. We’re the only normal ones! Let’s grab a beer. I’ll buy!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anastrophe

Anastrophe (an-as’-tro-phee): Departure from normal word order for the sake of emphasis. Anastrophe is most often a synonym for hyperbaton, but is occasionally referred to as a more specific instance of hyperbaton: the changing of the position of only a single word.

My days are numbered–like a clock ticking out my hopes. But–just because I have a time finite here on the planet, it does not mean that tomorrow is not another day!

I think I may be good for another 30 or 40 years. Given my age already, that’s a lot of years, but what the hell, I like to hope BIG. It’s a great way of stifling worry and stifled worry is worth more than I can say, especially when the stifling is effortless! Another day tomorrow is. I’m betting on being there.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anesis

Anesis (an’-e-sis): Adding a concluding sentence that diminishes the effect of what has been said previously. The opposite of epitasis.

Your dog is beautiful, but don’t you get tired of picking up his shit and bagging it every time you go for a walk?

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.edu.byu)

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Antanaclasis

Antanaclasis (an’-ta-na-cla’-sis): The repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance.

There isn’t enough room in your room to even call it a room: it’s more like a walk-in closet with a window. You need to do some remodeling. If you knock out that wall over there, you’re room will be a knock out! You’ll say “wow” to yourself every time you go to bed–it’ll be like sleeping in a bed of roses.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Antanagoge

Antanagoge (an’-ta-na’-go-gee): Putting a positive spin on something that is nevertheless acknowledged to be negative or difficult.

You got your MBA. You got you’re first job!   So what, if you work 14 hours a day for peanuts. At least you’ve got a job. That’s more than a lot of people can say. Also, so what if nobody’s ever heard of the company you’re working for. I bet the FBI has! But that’s a positive thing–eventually you could end up being a star witness, gaining the kind of notoriety lots of people would pay for! Or, if you help steer the company’s woes in the ‘right’ direction, you could get a huge pay raise and a high-powered promotion to the top of the heap!

Wow! I envy you, and I hope you don’t get shot on the job or anything like that. And hey, even if you do, somebody will want to make a movie, and if you survived being shot, you’ll get tons of money just for being a consultant.

Things are looking good for you my friend! Take care! Keep you head down! See you around.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Antenantiosis

Antenantiosis  (an’-ten-an’-ti-os’-is): See litotes. (Deliberate understatement, especially when expressing a thought by denying its opposite. The Ad Herennium author suggests litotes as a means of expressing modesty [downplaying one’s accomplishments] in order to gain the audience’s favor [establishing ethos]).

I don’t deserve this award–really–I bribed the judges. But the judge was not totally corrupt–he needed the money to his not so small medical bills. Its not like my admission ruins the entire competition. I’ve seen worse–my behavior’s not too bad, but it could be better.

Will I be arrested, or can I just give back the award and we forget about it? If you arrest me, I’ll let them you’re not exactly the most perfect person in this world, or any other world for that matter! You know what I mean Mr. My-Hands-Are-Clean.

 

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anthimeria

Anthimeria (an-thi-mer’-i-a): Substitution of one part of speech for another (such as a noun used as a verb).

Trump has porn starred his way to to a whole new level of impropriety. Sure, he had sex with her before he was President. But what the hell does that matter. He cheated on his wife with a porn star while Melania sat home patting her baby bump.

As the dribs and drabs of the despicable personal life Trump leads come out, and his treatment of women as sex objects is made public, one wonders what’s next. Will it be a Roy Moore mockery? A Carlos Danger defection? An Eliot Spitzer $15,000 hooker blitzer?

Or, do we just end up with the Donald Trump Hump-a-Dump–a sexually charged dance routine on Saturday Night Live? Alec Baldwin–are you ready to Trump Hump-a-Dump?

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Anthypophora

Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

Where are we headed? More expensive cans! More expensive cars! More expensive bridges! More expensive skyscrapers! More expensive steel.

Trade wars are good? Easy to win? No, they are not easy to win. In fact, nobody wins–short term or long term, everybody takes a hit.

And then there’s aluminum: we only mine a tiny bit of bauxite (makes aluminum) in the US. Is there going to be a tariff on bauxite? What can we do about that? Nothing.

Is this trade war thing a good idea? No, certainly not!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Antimetabole

Antimetabole (an’-ti-me-ta’-bo-lee): Repetition of words, in successive clauses, in reverse grammatical order.

We go forward, we go back. We go back, we go forward. Again and again. Nothing gets resolved. “Resolved” gets nothing.

He said, “Promises are made to be kept” and he kept promising and the promises were never kept. He said at the Town Hall Meeting: “Ask not what I promised, but promise what I ask.” We all looked at each other, stunned. What he had said seemed to carry some deep meaning.

But I didn’t care what meaning it carried. I was hungry and angry!

Tonight, I wave my axe handle and move along with the crowd. We are storming the White House. We are seeking justice for the lies we had been told. We don’t have a chance of breaking down the fence, but we are moving ahead anyway.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Antimetathesis

Antimetathesis (an-ti-me-ta’-the-sis): Inversion of the members of an antithesis.

You’re so hot–everybody wants a piece of you.

You’re so cold–you could care less as you rest on your flimsy laurels.

You better start paying attention to your fans: fans are notoriously fickle. Their hot fires of admiration will turn into icebergs over night if you don’t warm up to their overtures.

Cold and Hot, hot and cold: you need to turn up the heat and fan your fans’ flames of love and wonder. They will think it’s cool!

Go for it!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Antiprosopopoeia

Antiprosopopoeia (an-ti-pro-so-po-pe’-i-a): The representation of persons [or other animate beings] as inanimate objects. This inversion of prosopopoeia or personification can simply be the use of a metaphor to depict or describe a person [or other animate being].

Hey look–it’s President Dump! I’m not talking about that kind of dump. I’m talking about the random collection of garbage euphemistically called a land fill. President Dump has been in office over a year and all he’s done is accumulate trash–he calls it executive orders, I call it swill–rotten waste material stinking up the USA.

Let’s face it, President Dump’s mind is a garbage pail that’s never been emptied. It’s overflowing with 71 years of slop. There’s no way to fix it. We’ve just got to hold our noses until 2020 and hope he goes back to doing what he does best: swindling, declaring bankruptcy, and being a jerk (which he’s doing now).

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

 

Antirrhesis

Antirrhesis (an-tir-rhee’-sis): Rejecting reprehensively the opinion or authority of someone.

Your idiocy outstrips itself as you dance the dullard dance toward yet another belief that’s right up there with the moon being made of green cheese, which you actually believe!

You think we should so something about gun control. So far, so good. But, my God–you want to arm cats and dogs–dogs with rifles and cats with handguns. You want to mount dash cams on them and somehow hook them up to a remote trigger-pulling mechanism?

First, your idea is utterly insane–especially you reason for arming cats with handguns instead of rifles–something about their tails fitting better in the smaller trigger guards on handguns and the likelihood they’ll be able to fire more rapidly. And then, there’s dogs with rifles! No comment. Just plain insane.

Second, where the hell does your plan say anything at all about gun control? Nowhere. Nothing. Nada. Zip.

You need to go stand in a corner and think about how stupid you are. When you think you’ve stood there long enough, come back over here and we can talk. But please, no gun toting cats and dogs. Gun toting people are a big enough problem.

So, go! Get over there!

Definition courtesy of Silva Rhetoricae (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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