Anthypophora (an’-thi-po’-phor-a): A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one’s own questions (or raises and then settles imaginary objections). Reasoning aloud. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one’s adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

Where are we headed? More expensive cans! More expensive cars! More expensive bridges! More expensive skyscrapers! More expensive steel.

Trade wars are good? Easy to win? No, they are not easy to win. In fact, nobody wins–short term or long term, everybody takes a hit.

And then there’s aluminum: we only mine a tiny bit of bauxite (makes aluminum) in the US. Is there going to be a tariff on bauxite? What can we do about that? Nothing.

Is this trade war thing a good idea? No, certainly not!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (

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