Tag Archives: isocolon

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.


I gave you money. You gave me grief. I gave you a giant TV. You gave me a VHS tape. I managed to find a VHS player at a pawn shop and was able to play the tape. It was your wedding! You were drunk and kept lifting your dress and yelling “Come on baby, let’s do the hokey pokey. Emphasis on pokey!” Then, you went to light a cigarette and your wedding dress caught on fire, there was screaming and the screen went blank. Then it came back on.You were standing there crying with a singed dress and most of your hair burned off.

I have no idea why you gave me the tape, but I’ve always wondered about the patch behind your ear where no hair grows. And why did you give it to me now? We’ve been together for forty years, raised two children and have had a pretty good life. There are so many things about me I’ve never told you. All the money I lost betting on horses. All the women I had affairs with. All the bird houses I made in the basement. The women and horses predate you, but I have a clandestine bird house operation going deep in the basement.

Oh well. Life is a mystery. When I get home tonight we can have a couple glasses of wine and do the hokey pokey. No smoking!


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

He cheated. He lied. He protested. He appealed. He lost. He left. Thank God.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Buy a print edition of The Daily Trope! The print edition is entitled The Book of Tropes and is available on Amazon for $9.99. A Kindle edition is available for $5.99.

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

Big white beard. Suit of red. Must be doorman. Must be doorman. Doormen open doors!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Colon

Colon (ko’-lon): Roughly equivalent to “clause” in English, except that the emphasis is on seeing this part of a sentence as needing completion, either with a second colon (or membrum) or with two others (forming a tricolon). When cola (or membra) are of equal length, they form isocolon.

Colon or membrum is also best understood in terms of differing speeds of style that depend upon the length of the elements of a sentence. The Ad Herennium author contrasts the slower speed of concatenated membra to the quicker speed of words joined together without conjunction (articulus).

After the so-called “partial” US government shutdown, I bought a plane ticket, packed my bags, and flew to Canada.

Hello Vancouver! Goodbye “Teddy and the Texas Cruza-a-Nuts.”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

I drove. I parked. I shopped. I dropped.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

Allegations. Threats. Misrepresentations. Your PAC is a PAC of lies.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

The clock is ticking. The oil is gushing. The repairs are failing.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Paromoiosis

Paromoiosis (par-o-moy-o’-sis): Parallelism of sound between the words of adjacent clauses whose lengths are equal or approximate to one another. The combination of isocolon and assonance.

Today we headed back to good old New Jersey–back to the place we love.

We went to the West Coast just to see–to decide if we should move.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Colon

Colon (ko’-lon): Roughly equivalent to “clause” in English, except that the emphasis is on seeing this part of a sentence as needing completion, either with a second colon (or membrum) or with two others (forming a tricolon). When cola (or membra) are of equal length, they form isocolon.

Colon or membrum is also best understood in terms of differing speeds of style that depend upon the length of the elements of a sentence. The Ad Herennium author contrasts the slower speed of concatenated membra to the quicker speed of words joined together without conjunction (articulus).

Upon returning home, first, I hung my coat in the closet, and then, I turned up the heat.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Isocolon

Isocolon (i-so-co’-lon): A series of similarly structured elements having the same length. A kind of parallelism.

The past. The present. The future. Then. Now. Later. Later is later than you think!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)