Tag Archives: sententia

Sententia

Sententia (sen-ten’-ti-a): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegem, gnome, maxim, paroemia, and proverb.


“Always do what you’re afraid to do.” Because of that saying I am a different person. I used to be cautious and calculating—steering around my fear. Safety was all that mattered. When it was cold I wore mittens. When the speed limit was 25, I went twenty five. I paid my bills on time and ate the same healthy food night after night. I had my oil changed regularly. I crossed at the crosswalk when the light said “Go.” I always wore a condom. I took a cab late at night, even if I was only a block from where I lived. I always wore my seatbelt. I wore my face mask and got all my vaccinations. I wore sunglasses. I wore SPF 90 sun block. I had a colonoscopy every year. I wore Birkenstocks. I kept the batteries fresh in my smoke detectors. I sprayed my legs with DEET when I went hiking in the woods. I bought my cars on the basis of their safety ratings.

Then I met her.

The first thing she asked me was “What are you afraid to do?” I said, “The usual. Meeting Freddy Krueger, jumping out of airplanes, climbing mountains, diving off a cliff.” I was lying, there were enough more fears to fill a three-ring binder. That’s when she said it: “Always do what you’re afraid to do.” The “always” part of her words of wisdom is what threw me. I think there’s a saying about the pitfalls of “always,” but I don’t know what it is. Also, I am unsure of the benefits of always doing what I’m afraid to do.

So, she talked me into skydiving. We went through a couple of hours of training, donned our helmets and parachutes, got into the plane, and took off. We got up to around 3,000 feet and the instructor told her to “Stand in the door” and then “Go!” and then she jumped. It was my turn next. As I stood in the door, I saw her tumbling through the air and hit the ground with a puff of dust, like a bag of cement. The instructor pulled me away from the door. I sat down and we circled down toward the landing strip. When we landed, there was an ambulance pulling away from the drop zone.

Now, safety matters even more to me. I’ve added hand washing, changing sheets and pillowcases every other day, and spraying disinfectants to my safe-living repertoire. I’m thinking of changing my name to Marty Caution. Although I didn’t go through with the jump, I will not do anything again that I’m the slightest bit scared of. Lately, that means going up and down the stairs.


Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Sententia

Sententia (sen-ten’-ti-a): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegemgnomemaximparoemia, and proverb.

“When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” As crazy as it may seem, this was one of our wedding vows!

It has come in handy in our marriage many times–too many times. It was tough being married to Rubin. That’s why we finally got a divorce after 5 years of ‘getting going’. I was just not tough enough. So, I guess the saying that captures the choice I made would be: “When the going gets tough too many times, it’s time to get going to a good divorce lawyer.”

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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Proverb

Proverb: One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegmgnomemaximparoemia, and sententia.

“In the valley of one-armed men, nobody applauds.” Fredrick Knitpurl (Thus Spake Lefty Clapper)

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Adage

Adage (ad’-age): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings, or traditional expressions of conventional wisdom.

“When the going gets tough, the tough get Flomax.” Dr.  Gowyn McBunnet (From Bowling Balls to BBs: The Golden Book of Prostate Wisdom)

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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Apothegem

Apothegm (a’-po-th-e-gem): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, gnomemaximparoemiaproverb, and sententia.

“For every minute you remain angry, you give up sixty seconds of revenge.” Ralph Dubya Emerson (The Over-Sole: Under-Where?)

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

 

Gnome

Gnome (nome or no’-mee): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegmmaximparoemiaproverb, and sententia.

The truth does not speak for itself.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Maxim (max’-im): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, gnome, paroemia, proverb, and sententia.

“Love of wit makes no man rich.”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Paroemia

Paroemia (pa-ri’-mi-a): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, gnome, maxim, proverb, and sententia.

“No pain. No gain.” Anon.

“No rain. No grain.” Old MacDougal (Had a Farm c. 1917)

“Beggars can’t be choosers.” Anon.

“Choosers can be beggars.” A.B. ‘One Ear’ Dale, Licensed Beggar by Stat. xxii. Hen. VIII. c. 1512.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Proverb

Proverb: One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegmgnomemaximparoemia, and sententia.

A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it. (Prov. 22:3 [NIV])

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Sententia

Sententia (sen-ten’-ti-a): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegemgnomemaximparoemia, and proverb.

My wonderful husband once told me, “I may be lying in the gutter, but I’m staring at the stars.”

Tonight, here in New Hampshire, I know what Bill meant. But tonight it is a little different! It is snowing like hell and I can’t see the stars.

Ha ha! That was somewhat funny. Thank you! But seriously, if I were homeless, I’d just go to sleep and freeze to death in the gutter. But I am not homeless! I am not going to go to sleep! Instead, I am going to South Carolina!

Before I board my campaign ambulence, I want to introduce my new Presidential Campaign Manager, Mr. Ben Gahzi!

In the coming months, Mr. Gahzi will . . .

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Gnome

Gnome (nome or no’-mee): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adageapothegmmaximparoemiaproverb, and sententia.

Valor is the future’s promise steadfastly kept by love of country, community, family, and friends–by a spirit that overshadows fear and death.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Adage

Adage (ad’-age): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings, or traditional expressions of conventional wisdom. [Others include apothegmgnomemaximparoemiaproverbsententia, and anamnesis {a related figure}]

“I respect faith, but doubt it will get you an education.” (Wilson Mizner)

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Adage

Adage (ad’-age): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings, or traditional expressions of conventional wisdom. [Others include apothegm, gnome, maxim, paroemia, proverb, sententia, and anamnesis {a related figure}]

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Maxim

Maxim (max’-im): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, gnome, paroemia, proverb, and sententia.

“Where the river is deepest it makes the least sound.”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Paroemia

Paroemia (pa-ri’-mi-a): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, gnome, maxim, proverb, and sententia.

“It’s hard to make a comeback when you haven’t been anywhere.”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Gnome

Gnome (nome or no’mee): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, maxim, paroemia, proverb, and sententia.

Liars are the loneliest people in the world.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Proverb

Proverb: One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings. Others include adage, apothegm, gnome, maxim, paroemia, and sententia.

Pride only breeds quarrels, but wisdom is found in those who take advice. (Prov. 13:10 [NIV])

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Adage

Adage (ad’-age): One of several terms describing short, pithy sayings, or traditional expressions of conventional wisdom. [Others include apothegm, gnome, maxim, paroemia, proverb, sententia, and anamnesis {a related figure}]

No pain, no gain.

Or:

“Do not remove a fly from your friend’s forehead with a hatchet.” (The Quotations Page)

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Defintion courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.