Tag Archives: mempsis

Mempsis

Mempsis (memp’-sis): Expressing complaint and seeking help.

You told us we would get some “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. You’ve given us nothing. Come on–surely you have something! Please! I know you’ve got to have something.*

*This is fake news–purely fictional. Never happened.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Mempsis

Mempsis (memp’-sis): Expressing complaint and seeking help.

Hello world! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

The Alert gizmo my daughter pinned to my robe is fake! When I press the button with the red flag on it plays a ring tone and sings “Arise! Arise! Arise!” Although I find this very inspirational while I’m on my back here on the floor, I actually need somebody to help me arise, arise, arise.

I’m glad I have my iPhone in my pocket. 911 is a life saver!

“Hello 911? I’ve fallen and I need immediate assistance so I can arise, arise, arise. Yes, I’m sure it’ll take three tries, so please dispatch a paramedic strong enough to lift a baby minke. My address is . . .”

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Mempsis

Mempsis (memp’-sis): Expressing complaint and seeking help.

When the US government shuts down tomorrow, the US Congress will be paid as usual and the US military will get government I.O.U.s.

You can’t pay a utility bill with an I.O.U.

We continuously hear from Congress how it owes the military a debt of gratitude.  Clearly, Congress has already gone into default on that debt.

As far as I can see, Congress can pay its biggest debt today by offering the entire US an APOLOGY for failing to govern, and by donating their bloated paychecks to the men and women in uniform who actually deserve to be paid!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Mempsis

Mempsis (memp’-sis): Expressing complaint and seeking help.

Something is very wrong and it needs a lot of fixing. You work hard, yet you can’t afford college for your children. You work hard, yet you can’t afford health insurance for your children. In some cases, even though you work hard–maybe even at two jobs–you can’t provide your children with a nice place to live.  And what’s worse, you can’t even look your children straight in the eye and say, “Don’t worry, everything’s going to be all right.” Well, the only way to make everything all right–to make it better–is to join together and help me help you make everything all right. In less than a year, with your vote, we can turn things around. The future can be better.  I need your help. But, I need your help now. I need to be on that ballot in November if we’re going make everything all right.  So,  . . .

  • Post your own mempsis on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).