Anacoluthon


Anacoluthon (an-a-co-lu’-thon): A grammatical interruption or lack of implied sequence within a sentence. That is, beginning a sentence in a way that implies a certain logical resolution, but concluding it differently than the grammar leads one to expect. Anacoluthon can be either a grammatical fault or a stylistic virtue, depending on its use. In either case, it is an interruption or a verbal lack of symmetry. Anacoluthon is characteristic of spoken language or interior thought, and thus suggests those domains when it occurs in writing.

Sometimes impatience is a virtue, but your shoes are scuffed, and worn down and in a state of disrepair. If you need more context to understand what I’m talking about, there might be time find it, but it’s not the on way to San Jose. Just walk in the right direction and your conscience will be cleared, or leave tracks that somebody else can follow. At any rate, calm down.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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