Monthly Archives: August 2014

Epitasis

Epitasis (e-pit’-a-sis): The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification. [The opposite of anesis.]

In every religious text, “doing good” is lauded and “doing evil” is vituperated. Suspended between good and evil, heaven and hell,  religious people are bound to decide which is which, why to do, and how to act in accord with a higher being’s will, aiming always all the time to everywhere “do good.”

The resulting catalog of actions motivated by “doing good” range from washing other peoples’ feet to cutting off other peoples’ heads.

All in a day history is made.  From toe to head, washing and cutting; bubbling suds, bubbling blood.

Healing and murdering.

Doing good.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Epitheton

Epitheton (e-pith’-e-ton): Attributing to a person or thing a quality or description-sometimes by the simple addition of a descriptive adjective; sometimes through a descriptive or metaphorical apposition.  (Note: If the description is given in place of the name, instead of in addition to it, it becomes antonomasia or periphrasis.)

D-Tape Dick is well-known for the life-sized humorous effigies he creates out of duct tape. His best known piece is “Abe Lincoln Dancing on a Fly Swatter Outside a Liquor Store.”

My favorite is “Carl Rove Bending Over With Blue Toothbrush Protruding.”

It is rumored that D-Tape Dick is currently working on a series called “Protrusions” that features additional celebrities posed with ‘signature’ protrusions. We’ve heard that Rush Limbaugh is up next, protruding a golden microphone, followed by Lady Gaga with a pork chop.

Where will it end?  Ha. Ha.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epitrope

Epitrope (e-pi’-tro-pe): A figure in which one turns things over to one’s hearers, either pathetically, ironically, or in such a way as to suggest a proof of something without having to state it. Epitrope often takes the form of granting permission (hence its Latin name, permissio), submitting something for consideration, or simply referring to the abilities of the audience to supply the meaning that the speaker passes over (hence Puttenham’s term, figure of reference). Epitrope can be either biting in its irony, or flattering in its deference.

A specific form of epitrope is the (apparent) admission of what is wrong in order to carry our point.

Go ahead, don’t vote! It doesn’t matter if another candidate gets elected that might as well come from Mars. Who cares if our mayor works for us? Who cares if our children get the best public education possible? Who cares if our police force is a pack of donut-sucking cretan lickspittles?

Have another beer.

It’s good to be an irresponsible oaf! Enjoy yourself!

A rubber bullet in the butt is just what you need!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epizeugma

Epizeugma (ep-i-zoog’-ma): Placing the verb that holds together the entire sentence (made up of multiple parts that depend upon that verb) either at the very beginning or the very ending of that sentence.

Life ebbs in the tide of time.

Ebbs life in the tide of time.

Life in the tide of time ebbs.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epizeuxis

Epizeuxis (e-pi-zook’-sis): Repetition of words with no others between, for vehemence or emphasis.

400 shot in the head, the back, the stomach, the heart, the lungs, the throat and neck. Mothers. Fathers. Daughters. Sons. Brothers. Sisters. Everyone.

Kidnapped. Sold. Ransomed. Crucified. Beheaded. Burned. Buried.

Stoned to death. Beaten to death. Bled to death. To death!

Death. Death. Death. Death. Simple. Startling. Stinking. Death.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).