Assonance


Assonance (ass’-o-nance): Repetition of similar vowel sounds, preceded and followed by different consonants, in the stressed syllables of adjacent words.

You’ve heard it before: “The truth will set you free.” It’ll get you more than you can see. For the truth itself goes unseen, except perhaps when a word like “justice” is printed on a page. It doesn’t take a sage to know that truth’s ‘exemplars’ can cause rage as the accounts of exemplars are conflicted and must be argued out: but even then, the anger may rise higher and higher like like a fire until the conflicted accounts burn themselves out, consume their proponents in disagreement’s flames, burst forth in sparks of persuasion as one party’s mind changes, or gently warm the arguers with the glow of  humanity and acceptance of their mutual fallibility.

The truth will set you free when you embrace your imperfection.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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