Commoratio


Commoratio (kom-mor-a’-ti-o): Dwelling on or returning to one’s strongest argument. Latin equivalent for epimone.

The news is fact-based. Facts can be verified. Calling news “fake ” begs verification. That is, the assertion that a given news story is “fake” ought to be easily verified by all the tests of truthfulness operative on the Internet and anywhere else where verification of facts may be called for in order to engender belief.

To assert that news is “fake” without evidence that it is in fact fake, is actually, itself, fake news, or at best an unverified claim, awaiting verification before it can be taken seriously, and as a fact, believed.

The problem with the “fake news” movement is that it is in itself representative of unverified, and therefore potentially fake news.

So, if you’re going to call it “fake news” please offer some evidence as to why it’s fake–some line of argument that challenges its truthfulness with evidence linked to the verifiable world of facts (AKA reality).

  • Post your own commoratio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

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