Apocarteresis


Apocarteresis (a-po-car-ter’-e-sis): Casting of all hope away from one thing and placing it on another source altogether.

When I was young beauty was in the eye of the beholder–I was the beholder and I was delighted  to be in the presence of beauty–of beautiful bodies and beautiful things.

Now that my sight has faded and my other senses are failing, I have found that being in the presence of beauty and beholding its glory can no longer be a source of delight: there is no beholding, just a dull awareness of the material world–of light and darkness and moving shadows and the garble of human speech.

Yet, as I drift into old age’s oblivion it is the persistance of the idea of beauty that lingers and embraces me and excites me and delights me! For this, I am grateful. For this, I am not fearful of what will come next.

When I was young, I thought Plato was an idiot. Now, I can ‘see’ the Truth of what he was telling me and why you should take him seriously.

  • Post your own apocarteresis on the “Comments” page.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s