Apostrophe


Apostrophe (a-pos’-tro-phe): Turning one’s speech from one audience to another. Most often, apostrophe occurs when one addresses oneself to an abstraction, to an inanimate object, or to the absent.

There was a time when we had faith in you cruel Democracy!

We were naive to think that our will would prevail in a world soaked with stupidity, malice, prejudice and fear: Stupidity, Malice, Prejudice and Fear–you are the death knell of democracy’s hope. As you circle freedom’s skies tolling loudly, drowning out the sounds of love, optimism, charity and peace people look up to you, able only to hear your rumbling spite-filled proclamations.

When the peoples’ will is rotten, where do we turn to save democracy’s soul? We turn to you Democracy! To persuasion. To truth. To the light of day and the bright guiding stars of night.

Together, we shall close the abyss and pave the way toward better days: days that celebrate our faith in “we the people” and the mysterious bonds of friendship and trust that can bind us together without without tying us down: that can fulfill our need for autonomy and connectedness: my need for me and our need for us.

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

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