Tag Archives: synonymia

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was a big, tall, towering nightmare. A screamer. A yeller. A beligerant blunt-force human trauma.  He never backed down. He never gave way. He got hit by a Fedex truck. Then, he hit the Fedex truck, sued, won, and moved to Belize.

Or:

He’s a father, brother, son, husband, uncle, cousin, nephew, and grandson. He’s connected 8 ways to his family, but only one way to his friends!

Or:

In summer, he spent his afternoons rolling cigarettes in the garage and “looking for things.” He would ride up and down the driveway for hours on “Phony” his minature pony.

At night he would go out in the yard, pull down his pants, and hop up and down until he fell over.

Every morning he would get up, go to the kitchen, stick his butt in the microwave, and crow like a rooster.  Then, he would boil water, make tea, throw a cupfull on the rubber portrait of King George III in the bottom of the sink and yell “Party on that Georgie boy.” His favorite breakfast was a pancake ham sandwich dipped in a bowl of warm Amarula.

It was during the fall, winter, and spring that he worked at night in his office, and during the day, in his laboratory in Washington, D.C. He was an inventer. He had 16,211 patents.  He made Thomas Edison look like a tinker. He earned well over $3,000,000 per year in royalties for things like his “How Now Snow Plow,” “Karmic Bath Towel,” and “Chunky Tuna Maker.”

In short, the guy was different. He marched to the color of a different crayon. He thought outside of the outside. He was a beggar and a chooser. He was a comma without a clause.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synonymia

Synonymia (si-no-ni’-mi-a): In general, the use of several synonyms together to amplify or explain a given subject or term. A kind of repetition that adds emotional force or intellectual clarity. Synonymia often occurs in parallel fashion. The Latin synonym, interpretatio, suggests the expository and rational nature of this figure, while another Greek synonym, congeries, suggests the emotive possibilities of this figure.

It’s Cyber Monday! Anything you want at a deep discount is acquirable, available, for sale, gettable, obtainable, purchasable, and securable with your credit card and a couple of clicks! For example,  you can get a six-pack of pink duct tape at Target for $21.98!!!!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was cruel, vicious, wicked, violent. A monster. A killer. A human stain! He got what he deserved. Now that he’s dead, we can put our lives back together again.

Or:

He’s a robber, a philanthropist, a farmer, a preacher, a sinner, a gambler, a winner, a saint, a liar, and my best friend. Am I in trouble?

Or:

In summer, he spent his days digging worms and feeding them to Ed (his pet Robin), practicing his acrobatics (he loved cartwheels and backflips), knitting what he called “nose warmers,” and sometimes pushing a shopping cart around in the basement, pretending he was at the grocery store and complaining about the cost of bread and milk and caviar.

At night he would go into the woods behind his home, strip naked, pound his chest, and spit at the starry sky.

Every morning he would get up, go to the kitchen, put his left hand in the toaster oven and sing the theme song from the musical “Annie.” Then, he would put two slices of bread into the toaster oven, turn it on, and wait. When the toast was ready, he took it out of the toaster oven, held one piece in each hand over his head and yelled (in French), “Let them eat cake!”

It was during the fall, winter, and spring that he worked at night in his office, and during the day, in his laboratory at M.I.T. He had won two Nobel Prizes in two entirely different fields: Physics and Literature. His teaching evaluations were through the roof. Over the course of his career he had landed nearly $20,000,000 worth of grants to support his scholarly and creative endeavors.

In short, the guy was a totally weird Nobel Prize winning genius nutcase. Not only that, he was my father and our whole family loved him. So did his colleagues. If only they knew!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synonymia

Synonymia (si-no-ni’-mi-a): In general, the use of several synonyms together to amplify or explain a given subject or term. A kind of repetition that adds emotional force or intellectual clarity. Synonymia often occurs in parallel fashion. The Latin synonym, interpretatio, suggests the expository and rational nature of this figure, while another Greek synonym, congeries, suggests the emotive possibilities of this figure.

Death Valley: Curtains Coulee, Grim Reaper Glen, Termination Trough, Necrosis Notch.

A Hell Hole by any other name will still kill you.

Don’t be found dead out there wearing a Weather Channel t-shirt with a blown out thermometer clutched in the skeleton of your hand.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

It’s unfair, unjust, and inequitable! It’s not morally right! It’s cheating! It’s  peddling lies! It’s pedaling on EPO! Lance Armstrong, loser of his own Tour de Farce!

Or

He shoved. He hugged. He closed his eyes. He ran. He stopped. He sat. He listened. He cleared his throat. He tied his shoe. It was a boot. It was a balloon. He woke up. It was his birthday.

Or

We were grateful for the shelter. We trusted the soldiers who had led us there. We prayed for our brothers and sisters who died without warning in the catastrophe’s wake. Gratitude, trust, and prayer drew us together and cradled our grief, and softened the blows of despair.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Synonymia

Synonymia (si-no-ni’-mi-a): In general, the use of several synonyms together to amplify or explain a given subject or term. A kind of repetition that adds emotional force or intellectual clarity. Synonymia often occurs in parallel fashion. The Latin synonym, interpretatio, suggests the expository and rational nature of this figure, while another Greek synonym, congeries, suggests the emotive possibilities of this figure.

It’s over for Rick Santorum. He is finished. His campaign is through.

Rick Santorum fought for what he believed in. He tried to sink the liberal Romney frigate. Our conservative Captain waged war until it was clear, apparent, and doubtless that he had to turn his wheel and shift his course a little to the left to win the battle for Admiral of the Republican Fleet.  He was unwilling to chart such a course, and now, continuing on his right-bound course he sails off to glory on the Conservative Tradewinds toward a safe and friendly harbor on cable TV.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

He was generous, kind, and open minded.  He had a heart of gold. He followed the Golden Rule. He was a saint.

Or

He stole. He gave. He won. He lost. He begged. He prospered. He failed. He succeeded. He lived a chaotic life. All extremes. No middles.

Or

In sum, the regulators failed to regulate, the engineers made no meaningful provisions for catastrophic failure, tremendous corporate profits were made, and now it’s time for all of you to pay–to pay for the laws that were wantonly broken, to pay for the colossal lack of oversight in implementing technologies without prudent consideration of consequences and safeguards, and most importantly, to pay for the environmental devastation you caused, and the lives that you have upturned, ruptured, and taken.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Synathroesmus

Synathroesmus (sin-ath-res’-mus): 1. The conglomeration of many words and expressions either with similar meaning (= synonymia) or not (= congeries).  2. A gathering together of things scattered throughout a speech (= accumulatio [:Bringing together various points made throughout a speech and presenting them again in a forceful, climactic way. A blend of summary and climax.])

She was smart, intelligent, brilliant.  She was a genius!

Or:

He was crazy, lazy, wealthy, wicked, and wonderful–he was my father!

Or:

This 30-year-old yo-yo stole $500 and 10 lotto tickets from his grandmother! His 82-year-old grandmother! His own flesh and blood! She raised him.  She fed him. She clothed him. She loaned him money. She nursed him back to health when he nearly died from a motorcycle accident! In short, she’s always loved him like she was his own mother. And what did he do in return?  He climbed through her bedroom window one warm summer night, scared her half to death with this ski mask pulled over his face, and stole her cash–her rent and her grocery money–and her lotto tickets too!

In sum, this loser wrote the book on shameless self-absorbed hateful greed–he is a model of wanton sleaze–a perfect picture of ingratitude–a paradigm of criminal treachery!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Synonymia

Synonymia (si-no-ni’-mi-a): In general, the use of several synonyms together to amplify or explain a given subject or term. A kind of repetition that adds emotional force or intellectual clarity. Synonymia often occurs in parallel fashion. The Latin synonym, interpretatio, suggests the expository and rational nature of this figure, while another Greek synonym, congeries, suggests the emotive possibilities of this figure.

This day is sad, unhappy, without joy–without the bright lightning flashes of laughter that often lit our stormy lives–she is gone, she is done, she is ended, and we are left here together to fill this time together with words of rememberance sent from deep within ourselves–to summon her bold loving spirit to our time of grief and longing as we begin to learn to live without her without forgetting, without cutting the threads of friendship she wound around our lives.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)