Tag Archives: polyptoton

Paregmenon

Paregmenon (pa-reg’-men-on): A general term for the repetition of a word or its cognates in a short sentence. Often, but not always, polyptoton.

Bound by faith, we are bound by a common dream! Our dream is  our hope, and our “hope is the expectation of victory.”

Today we dream of liberation. Tomorrow we will awaken freedom! Tomorrow we will stand in the light of justice, see truth manifest and feel the unfathomable joy of of being free!

  • Post your own paregmenon on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Polyptoton

Polyptoton (po-lyp-to’-ton): Repeating a word, but in a different form. Using a cognate of a given word in close proximity.

I like to like what I like to like. Why? Because liking what I like is likely to make me happy! Just imagine if I didn’t like what I like at the same time as I like it.  That is, one may like something in one sense, but not like it in another.  I’d rather like what I like in every sense! Does that make sense? Or do I look like a fool?

  • Post your own polyptoton on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Adnominatio

Adnominatio (ad-no-mi-na’-ti-o): 1. A synonym for paronomasia [punning].  2. A synonym for polyptoton.  3. Assigning to a proper name its literal or homophonic meaning.

1. You write like you’re using a pig pen.

2. Your empty promises promise to undermine what seemed to me to be a promising career.

3. Headline: “Cocaine Charge Served on Trey”

  • Post your own adnominatio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu). Bracketed text added by Gorgias.

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Being free is to be human, and being human is to be free. You may think that wild animals or pets off their leashes run free, but running free is not being free. Rather, it is being loose. Just because a living body can move, it does not mean that it is free. To be free is to choose, and choice is induced by persuasion, and persuasion is engendered by symbols, and symbols  are endowed with meanings by humans being free!

Again, bodily movement does not signify freedom. Being free is symbolically constituted in your humane human head as it searches for, or listens for a good reason to to do something and a plan for taking action to make it be or not be.

That’s the Burkean way!

  • Post your own traductio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Polyptoton

Polyptoton (po-lyp-to’-ton): Repeating a word, but in a different form. Using a cognate of a given word in close proximity.

Lovers love loving and being loved.

  • Post your own polyptoton on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Hope for rain and hope will reign even if it doesn’t rain!

  • Post your own traductio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Polyptoton

Polyptoton (po-lyp-to’-ton): Repeating a word, but in a different form. Using a cognate of a given word in close proximity.

Promotions promote employee morale (as long as the people who’re promoted obviously deserve the recognition).

  • Post your own polyptoton on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

A day without at least one mistake is a day that is a mistake.

  • Post your own traductio on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Paregmenon

Paregmenon (pa-reg’-men-on): A general term for the repetition of a word or its cognates in a short sentence. Often, but not always, polyptoton.

This victory is our victory. This day is our day. The time has come to seize the future!

  • Post your own paregmenon on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Polyptoton

Polyptoton (po-lyl-to’-ton): Repeating a word, but in a different form. Using a cognate of a given word in close proximity.

Recklessly driving drivers shouldn’t drive!

  • Post your own polyptoton on the “Comments” page!

Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)