Tag Archives: epistrophe

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

The horizon. The landscape’s horizon. The future’s horizon. Time’s horizon. Life’s horizon.

Facing the horizon, we ask, “What’s next?” We answer, “We don’t know.”

Anxiety stoked, we ask again, “What’s next?” This time the question has an urgent tone.

Decision is our fate. Decision is our duty. Decision is our humanity, and our humanity is bound by imperfection, uncertainty, and agency swaying to the chiming questions tolling in our heads:

Why? Why? Why? Why?

Love? Hate? Hope? Fear?

How? How? How? How?

When? When? When? When?

Now? Never? Tomorrow? Forever?

You decide.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-see or sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

We are going to the zoo. We are getting closer to the zoo. We are almost at the zoo. We are at the zoo! The zoo is closed. I hate the zoo. Whose idea was it to go to the zoo?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

Your promises are broken. My heart is broken. I wish your nose was broken.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

You’re already covered with tasteless tats! You promised me the bowling ball with your mother’s face on it was the last chapter in the incoherent mess plastered all over your skin! Now Cheepy? Jeez! Your body’s a Rorschach of impulsive mistakes!

You’re already covered with tasteless tats! Poor little Cheepy inked on your hand! I know you feel guilty because you stepped on Cheepy.  If you must do a new tattoo, why not just have “BIGGEST IMPULSIVE MISTAKE EVER” tattooed on your forehead?  It’ll title your skin’s story and give meaning to the mess! Why not? Your body’s a Rorschach of impulsive mistakes!

Go for it!

Oh, wait a minute, putting a caption on your head will de-Rorschach the rest of your skin! Besides, it won’t be an impulsive mistake–it’s even worse–it’ll be a calculated mistake!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Being free is to be human, and being human is to be free. You may think that wild animals or pets off their leashes run free, but running free is not being free. Rather, it is being loose. Just because a living body can move, it does not mean that it is free. To be free is to choose, and choice is induced by persuasion, and persuasion is engendered by symbols, and symbols  are endowed with meanings by humans being free!

Again, bodily movement does not signify freedom. Being free is symbolically constituted in your humane human head as it searches for, or listens for a good reason to to do something and a plan for taking action to make it be or not be.

That’s the Burkean way!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

It’s cold today. The bills are due today. I’ve got to do my laundry today. My cat is driving me nuts today. Why can’t tomorrow be today, today?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

Hope for rain and hope will reign even if it doesn’t rain!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Hear me! We have journeyed a long, long way. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! Our map is faith and our hope moves our tired feet. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! We are going home to the place to rest, to break bread, to call our own! I can feel it! We are almost home!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

Stand up for change. Speak out for change. Spark a movement for change. And, for a change, the world may be a better place!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophe, coenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

When will we get a new cell phone? When it has all the features we actually need.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

When will we get a new cell phone? When there’s enough coverage to enable us to call from anywhere to anywhere.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-see or sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

The measure of your happiness is the friends you make. The measure of your success is the differences you make. The measure of your character is the decisions you make. The measure of your measure is the measures you take. Do you measure up?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

I’ve have contacted all the witnesses relevant to the case. You’ve gathered all the documents relevant to the case. We’ve discussed every possible motive relevant to the case.  We still have a long way to go, but I think we’re making progress.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

Today we celebrate the hope that is honored and fulfilled by our being gathered here. Today is also a compelling reminder of what is not here.

The future.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

A day without at least one mistake is a day that is a mistake.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (e-pis’-tro-fee): Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words.

The real estate market is tanking. My stock portfolio is tanking. The economy is tanking. What am I going to do?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)