Tag Archives: anaphora

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-see or sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

We are going to the zoo. We are getting closer to the zoo. We are almost at the zoo. We are at the zoo! The zoo is closed. I hate the zoo. Whose idea was it to go to the zoo?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-see or sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

We never know what the future will bring. We never know what a promise will bring. We never know and yet we must travel on, not knowing, but hoping  for what only hope will bring.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophecoenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

Hear me! We have journeyed a long, long way. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! Our map is faith and our hope moves our tired feet. And, I say, we are almost home.

Hear me! We are going home to the place to rest, to break bread, to call our own! I can feel it! We are almost home!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Coenotes

Coenotes (cee’-no-tees): Repetition of two different phrases: one at the beginning and the other at the end of successive paragraphs. Note: Composed of anaphora and epistrophe, coenotes is simply a more specific kind of symploce (the repetition of phrases, not merely words).

When will we get a new cell phone? When it has all the features we actually need.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

When will we get a new cell phone? When there’s enough coverage to enable us to call from anywhere to anywhere.  And, it does not cost an arm and a leg.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-see or sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

The measure of your happiness is the friends you make. The measure of your success is the differences you make. The measure of your character is the decisions you make. The measure of your measure is the measures you take. Do you measure up?

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Anaphora

Anaphora (an-aph’-o-ra): Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines.

Health care reform was our hope. Health care reform is now the law. It’s what we fought for, and yet, it’s still a work in progress. Let’s keep making progress! Let’s finish the job! Let’s make it universal!

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)

Symploce

Symploce (sim’-plo-kee): The combination of anaphora and epistrophe: beginning a series of lines, clauses, or sentences with the same word or phrase while simultaneously repeating a different word or phrase at the end of each element in this series.

Today we celebrate the hope that is honored and fulfilled by our being gathered here. Today is also a compelling reminder of what is not here.

The future.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Traductio

Traductio (tra-duk’-ti-o): Repeating the same word variously throughout a sentence or thought. Some authorities restrict traductio further to mean repeating the same word but with a different meaning (see ploce, antanaclasis, and diaphora), or in a different form (=polyptoton. . . . ). If the repeated word occurs in parallel fashion at the beginnings of phrases or clauses, it becomes anaphora; at the endings of phrases or clauses, epistrophe.

A day without at least one mistake is a day that is a mistake.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu).

Anaphora

Anaphora (an-aph’-o-ra): Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines.

I love my daughter. I love my wife. I love my job. I love my life.

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Definition courtesy of “Silva Rhetoricae” (rhetoric.byu.edu)